Tag Archives: SAT

2022-2023 SAT registration is opened! Now what?

For those who check the College Board website often, you’ve probably noticed that the SAT registration is now open for August 2022-June 2023 test dates! Here is a quick guide on when the SAT tests are happening, the deadlines for signing up, and what you should do (depending on your graduation year).

 

2022-2023 SAT Test Dates

 

According to the College Board website, the SAT test dates and deadlines are shown below. You can register for all of these dates now.

 

SAT Test Date Registration Deadline Last Day for Late Registrations & Changes (extra fees apply)
August 27, 2022 July 29, 2022 August 16, 2022
October 1, 2022 September 2, 2022 September 20, 2022
November 5, 2022 October 7, 2022 October 25, 2022
December 3, 2022 November 3, 2022 November 22, 2022
March 11, 2023 February 10, 2023 February 28, 2023
May 6, 2023 April 7, 2023 April 25, 2023
June 3, 2023 May 4, 2023 May 23, 2023

 

Insight Advice for Rising Seniors (Class of 2023)

 

If you haven’t been able to take the SAT or the ACT at all, you are not alone. Many schools have extended their test-optional policy to the Class of 2023, and you can find out what your top-choice college decides to do in our Test-Optional Colleges HERE. If you are planning to take the SAT, you should start preparing now. Learn how to maximize your score during the summer with our guide on How to Prepare for the ACT or the SAT this Summer

 

For Class of 2023 who want to apply for Early Action or Early Decision, you need to take your SAT by October 1, 2022. If you are applying for Regular Decision, you should take your SAT by December 3, 2022

 

Want a strategic, proven way to boost your SAT score? Check out our popular SAT classes
Taking the ACT instead? Click here to see our upcoming ACT classes!

 

Insight Advice for Rising Juniors (Class of 2024)

 

Typically, we see juniors take their SATs once in the fall once and once in the spring (usually after a spring break study crunch). If you already have a score you are happy with, congratulations, you won’t have to worry about the new digital SAT. However, you will get to experience it first-hand as PSAT in October 2023.

 

By preparing for the SAT now, you are giving yourself time to get a head start on your college admissions process next year. This can significantly lower your stress level (and tasks) for your summer after junior year!

 

Just starting your SAT preparation? Our SAT Advantage Classes are designed to give you comprehensive topic review as well as test-taking strategies. 

Read more: Why Summer Study Can Be A Great Thing!

 

Insight Advice for Rising Sophomores (Class of 2025)

 

It may seem too early for you to even think about the SAT or the ACT. But it’s not! While these standardized tests are designed to challenge your English and Math abilities, their structures, formats, and timing are very different. With the new digital SAT on the way, you may want to take the SAT early to utilize all the resources that are available to help you get ready for the current SAT.

 

If you have already taken Algebra 2, which covers polynomials, trignometry, exponentials, you can start your SAT test prep! The best way to decide if you should take the SAT or the ACT is to take diagnostic tests for both. Taking both diagnostic tests can help you decide which test you are more comfortable with. You may like the SAT better because it allows for more time per question, or you may be an ACT person if you prefer to always have access to a calculator. Once you’ve figured out your style, you can focus on preparing for that!

 

Want to schedule your ACT and SAT diagnostic tests? We simulate the real testing environment to help you know how you will perform on the big day. Email us ( info@insight-education.net ) today or CONTACT US to find out more!

How Will the New Digital SAT Impact Your Children?

Are you wondering how the New, Digital SAT will impact your kids? Please join us on February 12, 2022 at 10:00 am for a Zoom presentation that will help to answer your questions. 

 

We will cover: 

 1. Why a digital SAT
 2. Will the ACT remain paper-based? Which one is better? 
 3. Which topics will be covered?
 4. Will the new SAT be easier than the paper SAT
 5. Can students take it from home?
 6. Will the UCs and Private colleges require the New SAT and if so how important will it be for admissions?
 7. Which classes will be most impacted by this change?
 8. Will more schools go test-optional or test-blind?
 9. Should I be preparing now?

 

About Our Speaker

Purvi Mody has more than 24 years of College Admissions and Education experience as the Co-Founder and Head of College Admissions Counseling at Insight Education. After obtaining her Masters in Education and MBA from Stanford University, she has guided thousands of high school students and their families in successfully navigating the college admissions process and developing college applications and essays that emphasize the students’ unique traits and talents.

2021-2022 SAT Registration is opened! Now what?

For those who check the College Board website often, you’ve probably noticed that the SAT registration is now open for August 2021 – June 2022 test dates! Here is a quick guide on when the SAT tests are happening, the deadlines for signing up, and what you should do (depending on your graduation year).

 

2021-2022 SAT Test Dates

 

According to the College Board website, the SAT test dates and deadlines are shown below. You can register for all of these dates now.

 

SAT Test Date Registration Deadline Last Day for Late Registrations & Changes (extra fees apply)
August 28, 2021 July 30, 2021 August 17, 2021
October 2, 2021 September 3, 2021 September 21, 2021
November 6, 2021 October 8, 2021 October 26, 2021
December 4, 2021 November 4, 2021 November 23, 2021
March 12, 2022 February 11, 2022 March 1, 2022
May 7, 2022 April 8, 2022 April 26, 2022
June 4, 2022 May 5, 2022 May 25, 2022

 

Insight Advice for Rising Seniors (Class of 2022)

 

If you haven’t been able to take the SAT or the ACT at all, you are not alone. Many schools have extended their test-optional policy, and you can find out what your top-choice college decides to do in our Test-Optional Colleges HERE. If you are planning to take the SAT, you should start preparing now. Learn how to maximize your score during the summer with our guide on How to Prepare for the ACT or the SAT this Summer

 

For Class of 2022 who want to apply for Early Action or Early Decision, you need to take your SAT by October 2, 2021. If you are applying for Regular Decision, you should take your SAT by December 4, 2021

 

Want a strategic, proven way to boost your SAT score? Check out our popular SAT classes

 

Insight Advice for Rising Juniors (Class of 2023)

 

While some universities are extending their test-optional policy to fall 2023, many colleges will start to require standardized test scores as part of the admissions process. In addition, many financial aids and scholarships opportunities require you to submit an SAT or ACT test score. The best course of action is to start preparing the summer before your junior year. Typically, we see juniors take their SATs once in the fall once and once in the spring (usually after a spring break study crunch). 

 

By preparing for the SAT now, you are also working on your PSAT, which can potentially lead you to a National Merit Scholarship! CLICK HERE to learn more about the PSAT and SAT.

 

Just starting your SAT preparation? Our SAT Advantage Classes are designed to give you comprehensive topic review as well as test-taking strategies. 

 

Insight Advice for Rising Sophomores (Class of 2024)

 

It may seem too early for you to even think about the SAT or the ACT. But it’s not! While these standardized tests are designed to challenge your English and Math abilities, their structures, formats, and timing are very different. You may want to set aside time in spring 2022 to take both diagnostic tests. Taking both diagnostic tests can help you decide which test you are more comfortable with. You may like the SAT better because it allows for more time per question, or you may be an ACT person if you prefer to always have access to a calculator. Once you’ve figured out your style, you can focus on preparing for that!

 

Want to schedule your ACT and SAT diagnostic tests? We simulate the real testing environment to help you know how you will perform on the big day. Email us ( info@insight-education.net ) today or CONTACT US to find out more!

To Test, Or Not To Test?

In a land, devastated by famine and drought, shimmering pools of water and images of plenty tempted travelers and visitors. Were these hallucinations? Oh dear reader, these visions are inspired by the financial waves crashing on colleges – I was using a metaphor for the feast and famine landscape higher education institutions are facing thanks to the pandemic. Namely – some schools are financially “feasting” while others are facing enormous revenue shortfalls. Not all colleges and universities are in the same boat!

 

Consider this. The Wall Street Journal recently stated, “Binding early decision applications rose by 22% at Brown University, 23% at the University of Pennsylvania, 29% at Dartmouth College, and 49% at Columbia University. At Yale University and Harvard University, applications under the restrictive early-action option jumped by about 38% and 57%, respectively.”

 

Chart showing increase in number of college applications

 

Outcomes from Early Applications from the Class of 2021

 

The pandemic accelerated the shift in testing policy, leading to drastic changes in the college admissions landscape. In just a few weeks in the spring of 2020, over 95% of selective four-year colleges and universities announced their decisions to be test-optional for 2020-2021. Many seniors did not have an opportunity to take the SAT or ACT in 2020 before their application deadlines. Those who had planned for testing early (such as our Insight students) had the option to choose to submit their scores. With the barrier of testing removed for many students, they suddenly imagined the possibility of an acceptance offer from a school that might have been a dream previously.

 

This year is pivotal as students who are disadvantaged or discouraged by testing will have more possibilities than ever before. In fact, many highly selective schools such as Amherst, Boston College, Colgate, Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, UPenn, Rice, UVA, and Williams have recently extended their temporary policies to 2021-2022 application cycle; most others are expected to follow suit by spring.

 

A word of caution before you decide that the SAT or ACT will be gone forever – it is important to point out the wording of these testing policy announcements for additional insight into the school’s attitude toward testing. For example, Brown’s announcement started with “the extraordinary circumstances that continue to face students this year.” Stanford’s note in responding to Covid on standardized testing outlined that “if you have already taken the ACT or SAT…, then you are welcome to self-report them.” And Princeton’s statement included its process for determining academic rigor. “When considered in context and in conjunction with other academic factors, testing such as the SAT or the ACT can be very helpful in assessing a student’s preparation for Princeton’s curriculum.”

 

Without the barrier of test scores, many colleges are seeing surges in number of applications this year, as we saw with the Wall Street Journal article. Harvard saw applications rise by 42% overall and the University of California system by 16%. However, admissions offices are also delaying decision releasing date or making more use of wait lists due to the volume of applications. Overall, many top colleges showed a decrease in acceptance in the early admissions stage.

 

Chart showing drop in acceptance rate in popular colleges

 

 

Class of 2022: Keeping Your Options Open in a Competitive Context

There are so many colleges that changed their policies in light of the pandemic – you can read our very comprehensive and helpful list of test-optional schools here – that it becomes difficult to sift through the actual changes specific colleges make, the changes that College Board or ACT make, and the realities that colleges face – to figure out what you yourself want to do!!! Jeff Selingo tweeted about the practical limitations that admissions offices face – they simply cannot “add more days to the reading calendar,” which is why standardized tests are still useful as a “governor on apps.” If you were managing an admissions office, would you use tools that helped you make your work more efficient? Probably.

And something for applicants to consider is the behavior of one’s classmates – do you think others in your graduating class will skip the opportunity to take these tests? All things being equal, students who have scores to report retain a potential advantage over those who don’t. Having the option to send scores—to all colleges, to some colleges, or to no colleges—is a path we can help you plan.

As we continue to carefully monitor trends, we will continue to analyze the data available to us and share our insights on the impact of flexible testing policies. We’ve already seen that a relaxed testing policy does not make a highly selective school less competitive. In reality, it can boost a college’s desirability, continuing to limit the available spots and demand for them. Universities that were already in demand reached record high levels of interest in 2020, especially in their early application rounds, resulting in record low early admit rates.

 

Wish to improve your test scores? Check out Insight’s upcoming SAT / ACT classes here.

 

In the coming years, we will see if applicant and admission profiles at competitive colleges alter and what role testing policies have in that change. Please continue to follow Insight Education through social media as we update you on the latest in college admissions or schedule a 1-hour college planning session with our experienced counselors to personalize your academic and testing strategies. 

 

Read more: Ready, Set, Take the Test!


Written by Meilin Obinata

This article’s main contributor is Insight Senior College Admissions Counselor Meilin Obinata.

Meilin Obinata is a Senior College Counselor who enjoys learning from her students. She believes education is a creative endeavor and creates a space that allows students to explore new ideas. As a Bay Area native who grew up in Santa Cruz, she is familiar with the local schools. Read her full bio here.

Best Way to Prep for PSAT? Study for the SAT!

The Preliminary SAT, also known as the PSAT/NMSQT (National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test), is a part of the SAT suite. This test is offered annually to students in the 10th and 11th grades. You can only take the PSAT once per year.

 

What’s the Big Deal?

Your PSAT scores won’t get you into college or affect your GPA. But if you are a junior, a high PSAT score can make you some money! As implied by the name NMSQT, you can qualify for a scholarship if you receive a high score. Approximately $180 million dollars are awarded to students each year!

 

How Do I Study for the PSAT?

The smart way to do it is to combine your PSAT with your SAT prep. The two tests are almost identical. Just like the SAT, the PSAT breaks down into four sections: evidence-based reading, writing and language, no-calculator math, and calculator-allowed math. The slight difference is that the two tests have different timing; specifically, the PSAT is 15 minutes shorter than the SAT. The PSAT does not have an essay section and is scored on a different scale. But the question types and knowledge areas for both the SAT and the PSAT are the same. Thus, by prepping for the SAT, you are studying for two tests!

 

The Advantage of Combining your SAT and PSAT Prep

 1. Study Smart

We usually recommend that students start their prep for the SAT (or ACT) during the spring or summer before junior year. Setting the time to study in the winter break is a smart move if you are planning to take the PSAT and then the March SAT. And if you need a boost, the Insight SAT Prep Programs will help you systematically improve your scores on both the SAT and PSAT. 

READ MORE: Ready, Set, Take the Test!

 2. Feel Confident for the SAT

Because the two tests are similar, you will walk into your March SAT test knowing exactly what to expect. For the same reason, the Insight Test Prep Boot Camp includes 10 full-length practice tests, so you feel in control during the real SAT and PSAT.

 3. Time and Money Saved on Prep

Combining the two prep means you only need one set of study material. The Insight Test Prep curriculum is designed by elite tutors and test makers. By enrolling in our class, you will receive our SAT Binder designed to strategically help you excel on both the PSAT and the SAT.

 

Sounds Good, But What if I’m Planning to Take the ACT?

Your ACT prep also covers similar content and provides a good foundation for the PSAT. Test-taking skills, such as time-management and analytical thinking, will apply to every standardized test that you encounter. If you want to feel more confident before your PSAT, consider meeting one of our tutors for tailored PSAT strategies.

READ MORE: Should You Be Taking BOTH the SAT and the ACT?

A Summarizing View of SAT vs PSAT

  PSAT SAT
This Test is Good for… Scholarship opportunity  College admissions and merit-based scholarship 
Test Structure / Time

 Reading / 60 minutes

 Writing / 35 minutes

 Math (No Calculator) / 25 minutes

 Math (Calculator) / 45 minutes

 Reading / 65 minutes

 Writing / 35 minutes

 Math (No Calculator) / 25 minutes

 Math (Calculator) / 55 minutes

 Essay (Optional) / 50 minutes

Total Exam Time  2 hours and 45 minutes

 3 hours (without essay)

 3 hours and 50 minutes (with essay)

Score Structure    320 – 1520   400 – 1600
Insight counselor Jenny H shared her lessons learned from preparing for ACT tests

Standardized Testing: A Reflection

I feel like there are certain activities that will always make me a little—okay, very—nervous.  These include riding a roller coaster, watching a horror movie, and lastly, taking standardized tests!

 

Standardized testing was not my forte, and I felt like this was the most daunting aspect of the college admission process in high school.  For those of you who feel the same way and/or are in the midst of studying for the SAT / ACT test, I am motivated to write this blog post to reflect on my experience. In doing so, I hope that you will gain some insight into how to better prepare for these tests moving forward.

 

Insight counselor Jenny H reflected on her studying for the ACT test prep

 

What I Did Adequately

Even though there were some parts I would have done differently, there were a few things I feel like I did adequately.   

 

1. Be Determined

If there’s one thing I am at peace with, it’s that I was determined and worked hard to do “well.” My desk was piled high with practice books, and you would constantly find me in the library furiously scribbling into a notebook for hours.

For the majority of us, determination is a crucial component in doing well on the SAT / ACT. This is also the attitude you will need to succeed in college and beyond, so I hope that you will continue to develop this mindset while studying for the SAT / ACT.

2. Be Prepared on Test Day

On test day, I had everything ready: multiple pencils, an eraser, a calculator, etc. Even though I was nervous about the test, I knew I had everything I needed which at least alleviated a little bit of stress. Therefore, I strongly encourage you to come equipped with all materials on the day of the test!

If you are taking the test in-person, I also recommend visiting the testing site before test day if possible.  In case of unexpected circumstances—heavy traffic, you wake up later than expected, etc.—you’ll at least know where the testing site is instead of frantically searching the day of.

 

3. The Score Doesn’t Define Me

I wasn’t the best test-taker which reflected in my score, but I didn’t believe the results implied that I was a failure or predestined to fail in college.  I chose to be proactive in my studies and present on my college campus which wouldn’t have been possible if I’d given up because of my standardized test results!

Thus, if you don’t do “well” on the SAT or ACT test, don’t give up on yourself. Work hard in college! Consequently, identify and cultivate your gifts so that you can better yourself and serve your community. 

 

What I Could Have Done Better

However, there’s more to getting a “good” SAT/ACT score than just determination. The following is what I feel like I could have done better prior to the test and after receiving my score.

 

having structure and strategy for your test prep is key

 

1. You Sure About THAT Test, Jenny?

In retrospect, I wasn’t as mindful as I could have been when deciding which standardized test to take. If I had done a more thoughtful job, I might have gotten a score that more accurately reflected the effort I put into studying for it.

Thus, choose the test that you’re taking with careful consideration; one way to help you decide is to take both the SAT and the ACT diagnostic tests. At Insight, we offer both ACT and SAT test assessments so you can know which test is for you.

 

2. Don’t Just Study! Learn HOW to Study

As I mentioned, I had the determination to succeed. However, besides whatever guidance was offered in the practice books, I didn’t understand how to strategically approach each problem. If I could rewind, I would enroll in an SAT / ACT class to acquire these skills.

I recommend reaching out to a trusted individual in your support system who is skilled in taking standardized tests, as they might be able to offer some advice. Even better, if you have the financial means, I encourage you to take a class or find a suitable tutor who can offer valuable insight on creating a study plan and how to effectively navigate taking these tests.

We offer SAT and ACT test prep classes at Insight. The instructors not only review the topics and concepts, but they also walk you through test reviews and time management. You can click here to find out more.

 

3. Make an Action Plan

Given that I self-studied, I was fully responsible for learning all the materials before test day. I vaguely remember that I created a general plan, but I should have had a more elaborate schedule with more definite deadlines to ensure that I was completely prepared before test day. 

Consider making a schedule if you feel that it’ll help keep you accountable. I recommend using a planner so that you can refer back to the milestones you set.  Appropriate deadlines include noting when you plan on taking a practice test or reviewing vocabulary words. By breaking the task into smaller ones, it could make studying for the SAT / ACT feel more manageable.

Note: It’s okay if you occasionally veer off schedule! You might find yourself having a busier week than you originally anticipated, and instead of compromising your health, you can always adjust your schedule to make up for any material you missed. Remember, your well-being should always come first!

Insight Articles You Might Also Be Interested In
Ready, Set, Take the Test!

4. Take Practice Exams That Replicate the Testing Environment

Besides lacking the tools to successfully attack the exam, I also took practice tests in conditions that did not fully reflect an actual testing environment. As a result, I question if this was an effective way to study in hindsight. 

When taking a practice exam, it’s important to replicate the testing environment: don’t eat snacks, listen to music, play with your phone, and give yourself ample time to solve the problems (In other words, use a timer that reflects the time constraints you have on each section when taking the actual test). In doing so, you will ideally grow more accustomed to the conditions you will experience on test day.

 

5. Find Other Opportunities to Highlight Strengths

Given that my score could have been better, successfully highlighting my strengths were even more crucial when I applied to colleges as a senior in high school. While I tried to do so at the time, I’m now more aware of different opportunities, like working a part-time job or starting personal projects, that I could have participated in.

Everyone has strengths including yourself. If you are struggling with standardized tests as I did, I encourage you to find safe and reputable opportunities to showcase your strengths and interests on the college admission application. Your Insight counselor can provide some resources as well!  

 

Concluding Thoughts

In essence, it’s not only important to have the heart to study but the knowledge on how to study for these tests.

However, know that your SAT/ACT score is just one data point that colleges will consider, so it is not the end all be all. Remember, the SAT/ACT is something, but it is not everything. Moreover, a mediocre SAT/ACT score does not suggest that your doomed to fail nor does a stellar SAT/ACT score guarantee a perfect GPA in college. That’s partly influenced by your attitude and work ethic.

So work hard, study wisely, and good luck! You got this!

 


Written by Jenny Huang

This article was written by Insight Counselor Jenny Huang.

Jenny graduated from UC Berkeley after transferring from UC Santa Barbara. Her unique “inter-UC transfer” experience inspired her to become a mentor and a college admission counselor.

SAT Summer Boot Camp

10-Day Intensive SAT Boot Camp 

Saturdays, June 13 – August 22
* No Class on July 4
* Virtual Class hosted online via Zoom

For a detailed class structure and curriculum, please click here.

Target Test Date: August 29, 2020 

The Insight 1600-SAT Boot Camps

> For students looking to fast-track their SAT scores, the Insight SAT Boot Camp is the most ideal choice. This 10-day intensive test prep course includes daily full-length SAT practice tests and 4.5 hours of instructor-led class lecture and review. This structure empowers our students to build the endurance and the confidence necessary to succeed when they take the real SAT. The Boot Camps will cover conceptual learning, strategies, and the test-specific fundamentals, and the challenges of the given day.

> Our proprietary Boot Camp curriculum was produced in-house by our team of instructors and curriculum developers and is unique and separate from our SAT Advantage curriculum.

Want to improve your SAT scores? Click here to find out how.

Not sure which class is the best fit for you? We offer diagnostic testing bundles to allow students to see where they are scoring before deciding on a class. Please email us at info@insight-education.net to learn more!