Tag Archives: early decision

Applying Early – Insights to Optimize Your College Admissions Strategy

In the 2022-2023 admissions cycle, University of Southern California (USC) offered the Early Action option for the first time. Earlier in 2023, USC admitted 2,400 students from a pool of 40,600 applicants. That’s a 6% acceptance rate! You may wonder if early action and early decision can still be your best options to get into your top choice schools.

 

We designed this webinar just for you, rising seniors and families! Our college admissions expert will analyze the early admissions trends, processes, and limitations. Whether you’re planning to apply early decision, early action, or regular admission, this event is a must for anyone looking to maximize their chances in college admissions.

 

Date/Time: Tuesday, March 21 from 4:00pm – 5:00pm (Pacific)

Location: Online via Zoom

RSVP for your FREE tickets now

 

In this free online event, we will cover:

    • The latest trends and driving forces in the admission landscapes
    • What to do if you want to apply early
    • Do’s and Don’ts if you are applying Early
    • and much much more!

 

Our Speaker:

Zach Pava – Senior College Admissions Counselor

Academic planning and GPA in College Admissions by Zach PavaZach is the lead counselor and head of Insight’s Boston office. He also works with students from other parts of the US remotely. He graduated from Trinity College in Hartford with a B.S. in Psychology.  Zach’s background in psychology and managerial experience has allowed him to assess the specific needs of other people. No two students are exactly alike, as each brings his or her own unique personality, talents, and goals to the admissions process.

 

Can’t wait until the event to meet with us? Contact us today and schedule your 1-hour personalized college planning session!

 

We are looking forward to meeting you! 

Team Insight

Insights into Class of 2023 Early Admission Results

As college admissions get more and more competitive, you and your teen will want to boost your chance to get into your top-choice colleges. Beyond putting together a balanced college list and the best quality college applications, WHEN you submit your application can also be an important factor.

 

Early action (EA) and early decision (ED) have become increasingly popular with high school students as they strategize for admissions. Learn from Team Insight’s 120 years of combined College Admissions experience as we analyze the latest early admissions trends and results.

 

Date/Time: Tuesday, February 28 from 6:00pm – 7:00pm (Pacific)

Location: Online via Zoom

RSVP for your FREE tickets now

 

In this free online event, we will cover:

  • What has changed in the admissions landscape
  • Class of 2023 early admissions results and trends
  • Do’s and Don’ts if you are applying Early Action and Early Decision
  • and much much more!

 

Our Speaker:

Ajit Jain – Co-Founder of Insight Education

Learn the latest early college admissions trends with Ajit Jain

Ajit has a BASc in Civil Engineering from the University of Toronto and an MBA from Stanford School of Business. After his career with McKinsey and Co., he spent more than 20 years as a College Admissions Counselor and worked with hundreds of students. Currently, Ajit’s role focuses more on operation and management as he continuously grows Team Insight, in number and in talent, and trains new counselors.

 

Can’t wait until the event to meet with us? Contact us today and schedule your 1-hour personalized college planning session!

 

We are looking forward to meeting you! 

Team Insight

Accepted, Deferred, or Denied: Understand Early Admissions Results

If you submitted your college application early back in October or November, late December and early January is usually a very exciting time for you as you are starting to hear back your early admissions results.

 

Not sure when will you know your early decision or early action results? Check out Class of 2027 Early Decision / Early Action Notification Dates.

 

There are three possible results that can happen: accepted, deferred, or denied. In this article, Insight’s Head of College Admissions Counseling Purvi Mody shares what each admissions decision can mean for you and what you can do!

 

(More of an audio learner? Check out Purvi’s YouTube video here.)

 

Accepted!

Congratulations! You may have one or several colleges to attend in Fall 2023. Whether or not you have to accept the school’s offer depends on the early admissions plan you chose when you applied. If you applied for early decision (ED), it is binding and means you are bound to attend that university. In other words, now that you are accepted in the ED round, you can celebrate! You are done. Don’t forget to withdraw all your other college applications, turn down any other offers, and get your new college swags!

 

Binding or nonbinding? Early Decision vs. Early Action – Which to Choose?

 

If you are accepted into your dream schools, congratulations! That is amazing news, and you have accomplished a huge feat. This does NOT mean you can just party all the way till Fall. What this means is that now you can enjoy your senior year of high school. Spend time with your friends and family (especially if you are going far to college). Make the most of it while keeping up your academics.

 

Why can’t you just take things easy? First, you don’t want colleges to rescind your offers. Your grades will have to drop significantly for colleges to take back the offers, but the chance is never zero. The other reason (possibly the more important one) is that you are going to be a college student in a few months. Odds are that you are going to a college filled with brilliant, smart cookies like yourself. You want to keep up the rigor, the stamina, and the work ethic, so that when you start college, you are already used to the pace. If you start to take things too easy now, then you will have to work extra hard to level back up when you start college.

 

Keep working hard and finish your senior year strong! The beautiful thing is that now you are studying just for yourself. I hope you are always working hard for yourself, but admittedly, I know that college admissions are always in the back of our minds. Now, with your early acceptance, you are truly 100% doing this for yourself. So please keep up your rigor and continue to work hard for you!

 

Deferred

Whether you chose early decision, early action, or restrictive/single-choice early action, if you are deferred from the early admissions round, all that means is the colleges want to view your application in the context of their regular applicant pool. It is not a rejection. The college admissions office still finds you interesting and your college application compelling. In some cases, the admissions office wants more information before they can make a decision.

 

If you are deferred, continue to work on other college applications and apply during the regular decision deadlines. If you applied ED but were deferred and then later accepted in the regular round, you are no longer bound by the ED agreement. In short, if you are deferred and then accepted, you don’t have to attend that school. You are free to choose other colleges that offer a better financial package or a more appealing program.

 

What if you REALLY REALLY want to go to this college but got deferred; what should you do? Remember, you submitted your application back in October or early November. Now you have accomplished new things, such as your first semester’s grades, new activity achievements, or new responsibilities. Many colleges will allow you to submit an update or a letter of continued interest (LoCI). Some universities will have very specific forms that you need to fill out while others treat LoCI as optional. Be sure to check each school’s requirements carefully, so you continue to make a good impression.

 

Keep in mind that you are now competing with applicants in the regular round, and they will have at least six more weeks’ worth of information that they are submitting. You want to make sure you’re doing the same in your letter of continued interest. The information you want to include in your letter of continued interest could be

 1. academic performance (without restating info from your mid-year report)
 2. extracurricular activities (without repeating what is already on your application)
 3. new hobbies or responsibilities
 4. and any new achievements or awards

 

Finally, a few more key notes on the letter of continued interest:

 1. Keep it short and succinct. Ideally, your LoCI should not exceed one page.
 2. Check the university’s policy. Will they accept a LoCI? What should the format be? Follow those policies closely!
 3. Spend some time working on it, just like you would on your college essays.
 4. Send in ONLY ONE thorough update. Do not repeat information that is already in your mid-year report or college applications.
 5. Make sure you send it at an appropriate time. Usually, this is mid-January, though different colleges have different specifications.

 

Read more on Writing A Letter of Continued Interest

Denied

If you are denied in the early round, that college application is completed for this year. The college does not want any additional information, and you cannot appeal that decision. You also can no longer apply for the same college this admissions cycle.

 

Sometimes a student may ask, “If I am denied in the early admissions round, can I apply to the same college in the regular deadline?” No. In one admission year, you can only apply to one time to a given school.

 

This is not the end of the world. This does not mean you are not hardworking or driven. It does not mean your college application was terrible. There are many, many great schools out there, and we hope that some of those colleges made it into your college list. In this case, you should focus on other colleges, polish your college essays, and perhaps submit additional college applications.

 

Concluding thoughts: 

Those are the three early admissions results and what you should do in each case. The determining factor is your early admissions option. If you apply early action or restrictive early action, the result is not binding. You can still consider other offers as they come in. Though, I will say this final piece of advice: if you are accepted early into a college you’re definitely going to attend, stop applying. Give other applicants the spot. Alleviate yourself from the stress and time. Focus on making the most of your senior year!

 

If you are a sophomore or a junior planning ahead, don’t wait! Early application requires careful strategizing and early planning. Contact us today and schedule a 1-hour personalized college planning session with our experienced college admissions counselor to see how you can maximize your admissions chance!

 

 


Written by Purvi Mody

This article was written by Insight’s Co-Founder and Head of Counseling Purvi Mody.

Since 1998, Purvi has dedicated her career to education and is exceedingly well-versed in the college admissions process. Her philosophy centers around helping kids identify and apply to the schools that are the best fit for them and then develop applications that emphasize their unique attributes and talents.

Class of 2027: Early Decision / Early Action Notification Dates

For many of you, your college applications are almost completed (and there is light at the end of the tunnel, we promise). The next big item coming up is early admissions decisions!

 

The college admissions landscape continues to surprise us this year. The new, digital SAT will be implemented in Spring 2024, and some schools, such as MIT, terminate their test-optional admissions policy. With USC offering its first Early Action admissions option and CalTech moving to a new Restricted Early Action plan, notification dates for early admissions results seem more important than ever!

 

Insights on Early Decision & Early Action

For 23 years, Insight Education is committed to helping high school students and families to navigate the college admissions process, and that includes understanding your concerns and providing a tailored strategy for you. Here are the top 3 common questions surrounding ED/EA, and you can always reach out to your Insight Counselor or contact us to find out more!

 

Q: What do I need to do between now and the decision time?

A: Check your portal regularly! Set up a weekly reminder and commit to checking your email and college portal. Some schools may require you to send in your progress report for the current school year.

 

Q: What does my result mean? Can I do anything if I am deferred?

A: To understand your result, check out our article “Accepted, Deferred, or Denied: Understand Early Admissions Results.” If you are deferred from your dream school, don’t worry! You’re not out of the race yet. The school wants to compare you to their regular applicant pool OR they simply need more details from you. To learn more about that, visit The Importance of Writing A Letter of Continued Interest  

 

Q: What do I do about ED II if my ED I decision won’t come back until January?

A: You can still apply to ED II. When ED I notifies your acceptance, you can withdraw your application from ED II school.

 

Q: What do I do if my current progress report is not as good?

A: If you are improving but your progress report doesn’t show it, ask your school counselor to make a note on your progress report before you send it to your ED school.

 

 

2022-2023 College Admissions Season –
Early Decision / Early Action Notification Date for Class of 2027

Here are early admissions decision notification dates for the upcoming Class of 2027. Please check back regularly for updated dates and times as we gather the most updated information – especially for those without specific dates and times or those labeled “TBD.”

Last Updated: January 9, 2023

School

Early Decision I Notification Date

Early Action Notification Date

Early Decision II Notification Date

Early Action II Notification Date

American University December 16   February 15  
Amherst College December 9 @ 6:21pm ET      
Babson College December 14  December 16 Mid-February  
Barnard College December 14 @6:30pm ET      
Bates College December 20   February 15  
Baylor University December 5  January 15 March 1  
Bentley University Late December   Early February  
Boston College December 6   February 15  
Boston University December 13   February 15  
Bowdoin College December 9   Mid-February  
Brandeis University December 15   February 1  
Brown University December 20 @ 7pm ET      
Bryn Mawr College December 16 @ 5pm ET   ED2: TBA  
Bucknell University December 14   Mid-February  
Cal Tech   December 10 @ 8:06am PT    
Carleton College December 15      
Carnegie Mellon University

December 10 after 9 am ET

  February 1  
Case Western University December 5 December 21 Beginning January 9  
Chapman University December 16 Late December, rolling through early February    
Clark University Late December Mid-January Early February  
Claremont McKenna College December 15   February 15  
Clemson University   December 1    
Colby University On and before December 15   On and before February 15  
Colgate University Mid-December   Mid-February  
Columbia University December 15 @ 7pm ET      
Cooper Union

Late December

     
Cornell University

December 15 @ 7pm ET

     
Dartmouth College December 16 @ 3pm ET      
Davidson College December 15 @ 9pm ET   February 1  
Drexel University Mid-December Mid-December    
Duke University December 17 @ 2pm ET      
Elon University December 1  December 20    
Emerson College Mid-December Mid-December Early February  
Emory University December 15 after 6pm ET   February 15  
Fordham University December 20  December 20    
George Mason University   December 15    
George Washington University December 15   Late-February  
Georgetown University   December 15    
Georgia Tech  

 December 9 (for Georgia students)

  Late January (for Non-Georgia students)
Hamilton College December 15   February 15  
Harvard University    REA: December 15 at 7pm ET    
Harvey Mudd December 15   February 15  
Haverford College December 10   Early February  
Hofstra University  

December 15

   January 15
Indiana University Bloomington    January 15    
Johns Hopkins University December 16   February 17  
Lafayette College December 15 @ 4pm ET   February 15  
Lehigh University December 9   Mid-February  
MIT    December 17 @ 12:17pm ET    
Middlebury College Mid-December   Mid-February  
Mount Holyoke College Late December   Late January  
New York University (NYU) December 15   February 15  
Northeastern University December 8 February 1 March 1  
Northwestern University December 16      
Oberlin College December 15   February 1  
Occidental College December 15   February 20  
The Ohio State University   Late January     
University of Oregon  

November 8 

(some Insight students already heard the great news)

   
Pennsylvania State University (Penn State)  

November 15

(some Insight students already heard the great news)

   
Pomona College December 15 @ 5pm PT   February 15  
Princeton University   Single Choice Early Action (SCEA) Decision Notification:
December 15
at 7pm ET
   
Purdue University   January 15    
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute December 10  January 28  January 14  
Rice University December 14 after 5pm CT      
Rutgers University   January 31    
Santa Clara University Late December Late December Mid-February  
Stanford University    REA: December 16 @ 4pm PT    
Suffolk University   Late December    
Swarthmore College December 13 at 7pm ET      
Syracuse University  Late December rolling through January

 

   
Temple University  

November 18

(Some Insight students already heard the good news)

Mid-February  
Trinity College  December 15   Mid-February  
Tufts University December 13 at 7pm ET   Mid-February  
Tulane University December 1 at 4pm CT January 15 January 31  
University of Chicago December 21 December 21 Mid-February  
University of Georgia   November 18 at 4pm ET    
University of Illinois at Chicago   December 1    
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC)   January 27    
University of Massachusettes   Late January    
University of Miami December 9 Late January Late February  
University of Michigan   Late January    
University of Minnesota  

November 7

(Including engineering. Some Insight students already heard the good news!)

   February 15
University of North Carolina (UNC)   January 31    
University of Notre Dame  

Restrictive Early Action decisions released in December 16 @ 6:42pm ET

   
University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) December 15 @ 7pm ET      
University of Richmond December 9 January 25 February 15  
University of Rochester Mid-December   Early-February  
University of San Francisco Mid-December Late January    
University of South California (USC)    January 20    
University of South Carolina   December 14    
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)   February 1    
University of Wisconsin-Madison   On or before January 31    
University of Vermont December 20 December 20    
University of Virginia December 13 at 5pm ET February 15    
Vanderbilt University December 14 @ 5:30pm CT      
Villanova University December 14 @ 5pm ET January 20 February 15  
Virginia Tech December 9 at 5pm ET Late February    
Washington & Lee University December 16 @ 8pm ET   Late January  
Washington University in St. Louis (Wustl) December 13   February 17  
Wellesley College December 10   Mid-February  
Wesleyan University December 10   Mid-February  
William & Mary December 9   Early February  
Williams College December 9      
Worcester Polytechnic Institute December 13 January 15 February 15 March 1
Yale University   Single choice early action decisions will be available in December 15 after 5pm ET    

 

 

Your Best Insights to Early Admission Options

Over the past few years, all of us at Team Insight are noticing more and more families want to know if early admission option can increase their chance of acceptance. While early admissions may have a higher acceptance rate, it’s important to understand your options and weigh the restrictions before you send in your application!

 

Most of you probably know about early actions (EA) and early decisions (ED). If you are uncertain, you can learn more about them in our article “Early Decision vs. Early Action.” In addition to early decisions and early actions, we will also explain restrictive early actions (REA) and single-choice early actions (SCEA) and provide insights on Early Decision 2 (ED2).

 

Early Decision 1 (EDI or ED1)

If you look at any of the admissions statistics, you may be shocked at how high the acceptance rates are compared to regular decisions. Before you jump in and apply ED, note there is a catch. Early decision is binding. You can apply ED to only ONE college, and if you are accepted, you must withdraw all your applications to other universities. Essentially, when you apply ED to a school, you are signing a contract telling this school, “You’re my number one choice, and I will absolutely attend if I am accepted.”

 

Should you do that for your dream school? The answer is “it depends.” ED doesn’t mean less competitive; it may even be more competitive because it is a self-selecting process. Everyone who applies ED to UPenn is highly qualified, not to mention they are well-motivated to plan and start their application process early. If you are confident that you can finalize a high-quality college application by the typical November ED deadline, ED may be an option for you.

 

The other consideration is financial aid. Once again, when you apply early decision, you are signaling to the college that you will attend no matter what. This means colleges are less likely to offer you scholarships or financial aid. Therefore, if you are counting on financial help, then early decision may not be the right option.

 

Read more: Think it Through: Early Decision

 

Early Decision 2 (EDII or ED 2)

This is a relatively new admissions option, and not all colleges offer this. You follow the same rule as ED1. For many schools, ED2 deadline is slightly before or the same as regular decision. Why would you choose the ED2 option then? The main reason you’d apply ED2 is that you were deferred or rejected from your ED1 college.

 

Like ED1, your ED2 school is a college that you are excited to attend. Although early decision 2 admissions rate is not as high as early decision 1 acceptance rate, it can still provide you with a boost because of the binding policy.

 

A word of caution for ED2: some universities (for example, Santa Clara University) offer both early action and early decision 2. You cannot switch from early action to early decision 2. That’s why ED2 options need to be factored in early during the admissions process rather than treated like a backup option. If you are not sure which of your top-choice colleges offer ED2 or how to use it to your advantage, reach out to your Insight Counselor!

 

Have quesitons about applying early? Talk to one of our Counselors today!

 

Early Action (EA)

The deadlines for early action are typically November 1st or November 15th. For some schools and majors, you may need to submit your application as early as mid-October. When you apply EA, you can apply to as many schools as you want. A word of caution, some colleges offer EA programs, but the admissions process is closer to restricted early action, which we will get to in the next section.

 

What’s the benefit of submitting your applications early? In addition to getting a big to-do item checked off before your high school finals, you also hear about the admissions results earlier. You may find out in December or January whether you get to attend your top-choice school, and who wouldn’t like that as a Christmas present?

 

The other advantage is you have time on your side to strategize (or relax) since you won’t have to commit to a college until May 1st. This gives you time to apply to more schools, compare financial aid options, and visit more campuses. Since early action is non-binding, you can choose what you like the most.

 

Restrictive or Single-Choice Early Action (REA or SCEA)

This is where things get a bit more complicated. Whether you see restrictive early action or single-choice early action, please note that REA and SCEA are interchangeable. Ultimately, it’s up to the admissions office’s restrictions, so always remember to read the college admissions website carefully. When in doubt, talk to your Insight Counselor!

 

There are two different types of restrictive early action, and we will explain both with examples. The first type of REA limits perspective students from applying ED to any universities, nor can they apply EA to any private colleges. The colleges that adopt this type of REA are Stanford, Harvard, Princeton, CalTech, and Yale (on Yale’s admissions site, this is known as the single-choice early action). This means if you are applying early to Princeton, you cannot apply EA to USC, but you can still apply EA to University of Michigan.

 

USC now words their early action deadline differently, so you may still be able to apply to restrictive early action to some of the examples listed above. Wonder how this might work? Schedule a personalized college admission strategy session with an Insight counselor today! 

 

The second type of REA does not limit the type (private or public) of EA schools you can apply to. Georgetown is a good example. On the admissions page, Georgetown classifies its program as early action, but their description of their EA program outlines the restriction. If you apply early to Georgetown, you can still apply EA to both USC and UMich, but you cannot apply to any early decision programs.

 

While it may be confusing on what you can or cannot apply, the restrictions end at the early admissions round. Both REA and SCEA are non-binding. Thus, you can still apply to other schools during regular decision deadlines, and you can enroll in the college that you like the most.

 

Final Insights

While you may use early admissions to increase your chance in getting into your dream schools, it’s still important to have a strong college application that tells a powerful personal narrative. Ultimately, it’s up to you. How thoughtful you are in putting together your college list. Have you talked to your parents about financial aid? Did you send your application to your Insight Counselor for review yet? Are you following up with teachers who can be strong recommenders? Have you been working on your college essays? Are you scheduling time every week to focus on your application and essays? These are all actions you can take to ensure you have the best chance of maximizing your college admissions acceptance rate. If you need help or additional clarification, don’t hesitate to email us at info@insight-education.net and let our team of experienced college admissions counselors help you!

 

 


Written by Purvi Mody

This article was created from an interview with Insight’s Co-Founder and Head of Counseling Purvi Mody.

Since 1998, Purvi has dedicated her career to education and is exceedingly well versed in the college admissions process. Her philosophy centers around helping kids identify and apply to the schools that are the best fit for them and then develop applications that emphasize their unique attributes and talents.

The Complete Guide to College Admissions Interview (Class of 2026)

As many of you have submitted your college applications for the 2021-2022 college admissions season, it’s important to update your calendar and check your inbox regularly for interview invitations.

 

You probably already know which schools on your list offer admissions interviews and whether the interview helps you demonstrate your interest in attending those colleges. Continue reading

Class of 2026 Early Decision / Early Action Notification Dates

For many of you, your college admissions season is almost wrapped up (and there is light at the end of the tunnel, we promise). The next big item coming up is early admissions decisions!

 

The effect of COVID-19 continues to impact college admissions this year. Many universities and colleges have extended the test-optional admissions policy due to SAT/ACT cancellation. While some colleges resume in-person campus tours, many universities continue to offer virtual information sessions and admissions interviews. In the Common App‘s optional essay section, students will have a chance to discuss how the pandemic affects their lives. One thing remains true: both students and parents are eager to know the admissions decisions!

 

Insights on Early Decision & Early Action

For 22 years, Insight Education is committed to helping high school students and families to navigate the college admissions process, and that includes understanding your concerns and providing a tailored strategy for you. Here are the top 3 common questions surrounding ED/EA, and you can always reach out to your Insight Counselor or contact us to find out more!

 

Q: What do I need to do between now and the decision time?

A: Check your portal regularly! Set up a weekly reminder and commit to checking your email and college portal. Some schools may require you to send in your progress report for the current school year.

 

Q: What do I do about ED II if my ED I decision won’t come back until January?

A: You can still apply to ED II. When ED I notifies your acceptance, you can withdraw your application from ED II school.

 

Q: What do I do if my current progress report is not as good?

A: If you are improving but your progress report doesn’t show it, ask your school counselor to make a note on your progress report before you send it to your ED school.

 

 

2021-2022 College Admissions Season –
Early Decision / Early Action Notification Date for Class of 2026

Here are early admissions decision notification dates for the upcoming Class of 2026. Please check back regularly for updated dates and times as we gather the most updated information – especially for those without specific dates and times or those labeled “TBD.”

Last Updated: December 13, 2021

School

Early Decision I Notification Date

Early Action Notification Date

Early Decision II Notification Date

American University December 31   February 15
Amherst College Early to Mid-December    
Babson College Mid-December  January 1 Mid-February
Barnard College Mid-December    
Bates College December 11   February 15
Baylor University December 15 January 15 March 1
Bentley University January 20   February 20
Boston College December 2   February 15
Boston University December 15   February 15
Bowdoin College Mid-December   Mid-February
Brandeis University December 15   February 1
Brown University December 16    
Cal Tech   Mid-December  
Carleton College December 15    
Carnegie Mellon University

December 11 at 6am

  February 1
Case Western University December 4 December 21 Beginning January 9
Chapman University December 15 December 15  
Clark University Late December Mid-January Early February
Clemson University   Mid-February  
Colgate University Mid-December   Late February
Columbia University Mid-December    
Cooper Union

Late December

   
Cornell University

December 13

   
Dartmouth College Mid-December    
Davidson College December 15   February 1
Duke University December 16    
Elon University December 1  December 20  
Emerson College Mid-December Mid-December February 1
Emory University December 15 @6pm ET   February 15
Fordham University December 20  December 20  
George Mason University   December 15  
George Washington University December 13 @9am EST   Late-February
Georgetown University   December 13 @7pm EST  
Georgia Tech   January 29  
Hamilton College December 15   February 15
Harvard University   Mid-December  
Harvey Mudd December 15   February 10
Haverford College December 10   February 15
Hofstra University  

December 15

(EA 2: January 15)

 
Indiana University Bloomington   January 15  
Johns Hopkins University December 10   February 12
Lafayette College December 15   February 15
Lehigh University December 15   Mid-February
MIT   December 18 @3:14pm  
Middlebury College Mid-December   Mid-February
Mount Holyoke College Late December   Late January
New York University (NYU) December 15   February 16
Northeastern University December 8 February 1 February 15
Northwestern University December 17    
Oberlin College December 15 @7pm EST   February 1
Occidental College December 15   February 20
The Ohio State University   January 29   
Pomona College December 15   February 15
Princeton University   Single Choice Early Action (SCEA) Decision Notification on December 16  
Purdue University   January 15  
Rice University December 9    
Rutgers University   January 31  
Santa Clara University December 15 December 15 Mid-February
Stanford University   December 15  
Suffolk University   TBA  
Swarthmore College December 14 @7pm ET    
Tufts University Mid-December   Mid-February
Tulane University November 22 @4pm CST December 20 @4pm CST January 31
University of Chicago December 17 December 17 Mid-February
University of Georgia   Before December 1 (for GA resident)  
University of Illinois at Chicago   December 1  
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC)   TBA  
University of Massachusettes   January 25  
University of Miami Late December Late January/Early February Late February
University of Michigan   January 28  
University of North Carolina (UNC)   January 28  
University of Notre Dame   Mid-December  
University of Pennsylvania December 16    
University of Richmond December 15 January 25 February 15
University of Rochester Mid-December   Early-February
University of San Francisco Mid-December Mid-December  
University of South Carolina   December 13  
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)   February 1  
University of Wisconsin-Madison   January 29  
University of Vermont   Late December  
University of Virginia December 10 at 5pm EST TBA  
Vanderbilt University January 15   TBA
Villanova University December 15 January 15 March 1
Virginia Tech Mid-December Late February  
Washington & Lee University December 15 @8pm EST   Late-January
Washington University in St. Louis (Wustl) TBA   TBA
Wellesley College Mid-December   Mid-February
Wesleyan University Mid-December   Mid-February
William & Mary Early December   Early February
Williams College TBA    
Worcester Polytechnic Institute December 15 January 15 February 15
Yale University   Mid-December  

 

 

Class of 2025 Early Decision / Early Action Notification Dates

For many of you, your college admissions season is almost wrapped up (and there is light at the end of the tunnel, we promise). The next big item coming up is early admissions decisions!

 

Like many things this year, the college admissions landscape of 2020 has changed due to COVID-19. Many universities have temporarily adopted the test-optional admissions policy due to SAT/ACT cancellations, and some colleges have extended their application deadlines to allow applicants to complete their applications. While this year causes many obstacles for the high school seniors and families, the anticipation surrounding EA/ED decisions remains high.

 

Insights on Early Decision & Early Action

Our mission at Insight is to help you navigate the college admissions process, and that includes understanding your concerns and providing a tailored strategy for you. Here are the top 3 common questions surrounding ED/EA, and you can always reach out to your Insight Counselor or contact us to find out more!

 

Q: What do I need to do between now and the decision time?

A: Check your portal regularly! Set up a weekly reminder and commit to checking your email and college portal. Some schools may require you to send in your progress report for the current school year.

 

Q: What do I do about ED II if my ED I decision won’t come back until January?

A: You can still apply to ED II. When ED I notifies your acceptance, you can withdraw your application from ED II school.

 

Q: What do I do if my current progress report is not as good?

A: If you are improving but your progress report doesn’t show it, ask your school counselor to make a note on your progress report before you send it to your ED school.

 

Q: Why can’t I find Princeton University on your list?

A: For the 2020-2021 application cycle, Princeton University decided to move to one application deadline of January 1, 2021. 

 

 

2020-2021 College Admissions Season –
Early Decision / Early Action Notification Date for Class of 2025

Here are early admissions decision notification dates for the upcoming Class of 2025. Please check back regularly for updated dates and times as we gather the most updated information – especially for those without specific dates and times or those labeled “TBD.”

Last Updated: December 14, 2020

School

Early Decision I Notification Date

Early Action Notification Date

Early Decision II Notification Date

American University December 31, 2020   February 15, 2021
Amherst College December 15, 2020    
Babson College Mid-December, 2020 January 1, 2021 Mid-February, 2021
Barnard College December 14, 2020    
Bates College December 20, 2020   February 15, 2021
Baylor University December 15, 2020 January 15, 2021 February 15, 2021
Boston College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Boston University December 15, 2020   December 15, 2020
Bowdoin College Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
Brandeis University December 15, 2020   February 1, 2021
Brown University December 16, 2020    
Cal Tech   Mid-December, 2020  
Carleton College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Carnegie Mellon University

December 12, 2020 at 6am PST

   
Case Western University December 5, 2020 December 19, 2020 Beginning January 8, 2021
Clark University December 20, 2020 January 20, 2021 February 20, 2021
Columbia University Mid-December, 2020    
Cornell University

December 12, 2020 at 7pm ET

   
Dartmouth College Mid-December, 2020    
Duke University Mid-December, 2020    
Emerson College Mid-December, 2020 Mid-December, 2020 February 1, 2021
Emory University December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
George Mason University   December 15, 2020  
George Washington University Late-December, 2020   Late-February, 2021
Georgetown University   December 15, 2020  
Georgia Tech   December 4, 2020 (Georgia Student)Mid-January, 2021 (non-Georgia Student)  
Hamilton College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Harvard University   Mid-December  
Harvey Mudd December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Haverford College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Hofstra University   December 15, 2020  
Indiana University Bloomington   January 15, 2021  
Johns Hopkins University December 11, 2020 February 20, 2021  
Lafayette College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
MIT   December 19, 2020 at 3:14 pm EST  
Middlebury College Mid-December, 2020   Early-February, 2021
New York University (NYU) December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Northeastern University December 15, 2020 February 1, 2021 February 15, 2021
Northwestern University Mid-December, 2020    
Oberlin College December 15, 2020   February 1, 2021
Occidental College December 15, 2020   February 20, 2021
Pomona College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Purdue University   January 15, 2021  
Rice University Mid-December    
Rutgers University   February 15, 2021  
Santa Clara University Late-December, 2020 Late-December, 2020 Mid-February, 2021
Stanford University   December 11, 2020  
Suffolk University   Late-December, 2020  
Swarthmore College Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
Tufts University Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
Tulane University Decemeber 15, 2020 January 15, 2021  
University of Chicago December 21, 2020 December 21, 2020 Mid-February, 2021
University of Georgia   November 20, 2020  
University of Illinois at Chicago   December 1, 2020  
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC)   Mid-February, 2021  
University of Miami Late December, 2020 Late January/Early February, 2021 Mid-Late February, 2021
University of Michigan   Late January, 2021  
University of North Carolina (UNC)   Late January, 2021  
University of Notre Dame   Mid-December, 2020  
University of Pennsylvania December 16 at 7 pm EST    
University of Richmond December 15, 2020 January 25, 2021 February 15, 2021
University of Rorchester Mid-December, 2020   Early-February, 2021
University of San Francisco Mid-December, 2020 Mid-December, 2020  
University of South Carolina   Mid-December, 2020  
University of Texas at Austin   February 1, 2021  
University of Vermont   December 17, 2020  
University of Virginia Mid-December, 2020 Mid-February, 2021  
Vanderbilt University December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Villanova University December 15, 2020 January 15, 2021 March 1, 2021
Virginia Tech Mid-December, 2020 Late February, 2021  
Washington & Lee University Late-December, 2020   Late-January, 2021
Washington University in St. Louis December 15, 2020   February 14, 2021
Wellesley College Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
Wesleyan University Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
William & Mary December 12, 2020   March 3, 2021
Williams College Mid-December, 2020    
Worcester Polytechnic Institute December 15, 2020 January 15, 2021 February 15, 2021
Yale University   December 16, 2020  

 

 

Early Decision vs. Early Action – Which to Choose?

If you are entering the college admissions process, you might have heard of these terms. You might even wonder what they are. What is the difference? Which is better for your college admissions strategy, if at all? Insight Head of College Admissions Purvi Mody is here to share with you all the insights on Early Decision and Early Action, so you can pick the option that best suits your needs.

Quick Summary

  –   Both Early action and early decision have earlier application deadlines than regular admissions.

  –   You will also receive college admissions decisions earlier, usually starting in mid-December.

  –   You can apply to as many schools as you want using EA.

  –   ED is for only one school, and it is a binding agreement, which means you have to attend when you are accepted.

“Early Decision” and “Early Action” are likely terms that you have heard before when talking about the college application process. The biggest thing to get your head around – what is the difference between the two? They have similar names but are quite different in their outcomes. 

 

 

What is Early Action?

As the name implies, your college applications are due earlier than regular application deadlines. Typical deadlines for regular applications can be December 1st and January 15, whereas early deadlines mean you’re probably submitting around November 1st. For some schools and majors, you need to complete your admissions file by mid-October.

 

There is no limit to the number of schools you can apply to using early action. This can be a great option because it means you have submitted applications to schools early in the season – they’re off your plate! But why would you want to submit your applications a month before everyone else?

 

According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC), early action means that “students apply early and receive a decision well in advance of the institution’s regular response date.” And that is a big advantage. You will receive your admissions decisions back earlier! You may find out in December or January about where you stand with your dream school. That may also mean you can relax and enjoy the rest of your senior year.

 

Another advantage with early action is that you do not need to commit until May 1 (the national response date), so you have almost half a year to decide and to compare financial aid packages. 

 

Though to make things confusing, some schools use restrictive early action (or single-choice early action), which is exactly like early decisions. The restrictive early action limits you to using the process only once. Thus, be diligent in your college research and weigh your options carefully before committing to applying early. 

 

What is Early Decision?

Unlike early action, early decision is binding! You can apply to only one because you are saying that if the school accepts you, you will 100% attend. Because of this commitment, colleges require signatures from you, your family, and a school counselor in order for you to apply early decision.

 

Early decision benefits students who know their first-choice college and who are confident in their odds of getting accepted. Similar to early action, you will also receive an admissions decision early, usually in December.

 

One of the challenges with early decision can be that you will not find out about other schools until later in the year. If you get into a different school that you’d actually like to attend more than your early decision school, you don’t have the option to switch. So be 100% certain about your early decision school. If you are torn on which school you would ultimately like to attend, or which major you’d like to do, early decision might not be for you.

 

Another aspect of early decision to consider is the financial side of it all. If you apply early decision, you’re telling the school that you will attend no matter what. This means they are less likely to offer you a scholarship or financial aid because they know they don’t need to add those incentives to sway you to attend their school. If you are counting on some financial help, early decision again may not be right for you.

 

Read more: Think it Through: Early Decision

 

What Are the Benefits of Applying Early?

By applying early, you stagger the deadlines, which alleviate the stress that comes with stacked regular admissions. Early action allows you until May 1 to decide whether or not you want to attend that school. Both early action and early decision show the schools that you have done your research and you are interested in these schools.

 

Something else to keep in mind is that some colleges do take a substantial amount of their incoming class from that early decision pool. Many elite schools look at early decision as a way to separate the students that are “kind of interested” from the students that are willing to commit 100% to that school. 

 

Should I Apply Early?

With all the advantages, it may seem compelling to apply early. Keep in mind that the early admissions process works best for students who know their dream school(s) and who feel they are competitive applicants.

 

How do you know if you are competitive? Check the school’s website. Most schools give you an idea of their applicant profile. In addition to your application, you need to thoroughly research the schools. It is not a blanket statement that “all elite schools will take a higher percentage of their class from the early decision applicants”. Some schools only take a slightly higher percentage, and in some cases, the difference between early and regular admissions rounds is not noticeable at all. Other than the academic offerings, campus, school culture, and location, you should also research the different available financial aid packages. 

 

Our biggest tip is to do your research! Talk to your school (and Insight) counselor, your parents, and family members. Figure out if you have a school on your list that might be a good candidate for early decision, and if you do, make sure you are prepared for the financially and mentally to commit to that school.