Tag Archives: undergrad admissions

The Complete Guide to College Admissions Interview (Class of 2026)

As many of you have submitted your college applications for the 2021-2022 college admissions season, it’s important to update your calendar and check your inbox regularly for interview invitations.

 

You probably already know which schools on your list offer admissions interviews and whether the interview helps you demonstrate your interest in attending those colleges. Continue reading

Class of 2026 Early Decision / Early Action Notification Dates

For many of you, your college admissions season is almost wrapped up (and there is light at the end of the tunnel, we promise). The next big item coming up is early admissions decisions!

 

The effect of COVID-19 continues to impact college admissions this year. Many universities and colleges have extended the test-optional admissions policy due to SAT/ACT cancellation. While some colleges resume in-person campus tours, many universities continue to offer virtual information sessions and admissions interviews. In the Common App‘s optional essay section, students will have a chance to discuss how the pandemic affects their lives. One thing remains true: both students and parents are eager to know the admissions decisions!

 

Insights on Early Decision & Early Action

For 22 years, Insight Education is committed to helping high school students and families to navigate the college admissions process, and that includes understanding your concerns and providing a tailored strategy for you. Here are the top 3 common questions surrounding ED/EA, and you can always reach out to your Insight Counselor or contact us to find out more!

 

Q: What do I need to do between now and the decision time?

A: Check your portal regularly! Set up a weekly reminder and commit to checking your email and college portal. Some schools may require you to send in your progress report for the current school year.

 

Q: What do I do about ED II if my ED I decision won’t come back until January?

A: You can still apply to ED II. When ED I notifies your acceptance, you can withdraw your application from ED II school.

 

Q: What do I do if my current progress report is not as good?

A: If you are improving but your progress report doesn’t show it, ask your school counselor to make a note on your progress report before you send it to your ED school.

 

 

2021-2022 College Admissions Season –
Early Decision / Early Action Notification Date for Class of 2026

Here are early admissions decision notification dates for the upcoming Class of 2026. Please check back regularly for updated dates and times as we gather the most updated information – especially for those without specific dates and times or those labeled “TBD.”

Last Updated: December 13, 2021

School

Early Decision I Notification Date

Early Action Notification Date

Early Decision II Notification Date

American University December 31   February 15
Amherst College Early to Mid-December    
Babson College Mid-December  January 1 Mid-February
Barnard College Mid-December    
Bates College December 11   February 15
Baylor University December 15 January 15 March 1
Bentley University January 20   February 20
Boston College December 2   February 15
Boston University December 15   February 15
Bowdoin College Mid-December   Mid-February
Brandeis University December 15   February 1
Brown University December 16    
Cal Tech   Mid-December  
Carleton College December 15    
Carnegie Mellon University

December 11 at 6am

  February 1
Case Western University December 4 December 21 Beginning January 9
Chapman University December 15 December 15  
Clark University Late December Mid-January Early February
Clemson University   Mid-February  
Colgate University Mid-December   Late February
Columbia University Mid-December    
Cooper Union

Late December

   
Cornell University

December 13

   
Dartmouth College Mid-December    
Davidson College December 15   February 1
Duke University December 16    
Elon University December 1  December 20  
Emerson College Mid-December Mid-December February 1
Emory University December 15 @6pm ET   February 15
Fordham University December 20  December 20  
George Mason University   December 15  
George Washington University December 13 @9am EST   Late-February
Georgetown University   December 13 @7pm EST  
Georgia Tech   January 29  
Hamilton College December 15   February 15
Harvard University   Mid-December  
Harvey Mudd December 15   February 10
Haverford College December 10   February 15
Hofstra University  

December 15

(EA 2: January 15)

 
Indiana University Bloomington   January 15  
Johns Hopkins University December 10   February 12
Lafayette College December 15   February 15
Lehigh University December 15   Mid-February
MIT   December 18 @3:14pm  
Middlebury College Mid-December   Mid-February
Mount Holyoke College Late December   Late January
New York University (NYU) December 15   February 16
Northeastern University December 8 February 1 February 15
Northwestern University December 17    
Oberlin College December 15 @7pm EST   February 1
Occidental College December 15   February 20
The Ohio State University   January 29   
Pomona College December 15   February 15
Princeton University   Single Choice Early Action (SCEA) Decision Notification on December 16  
Purdue University   January 15  
Rice University December 9    
Rutgers University   January 31  
Santa Clara University December 15 December 15 Mid-February
Stanford University   December 15  
Suffolk University   TBA  
Swarthmore College December 14 @7pm ET    
Tufts University Mid-December   Mid-February
Tulane University November 22 @4pm CST December 20 @4pm CST January 31
University of Chicago December 17 December 17 Mid-February
University of Georgia   Before December 1 (for GA resident)  
University of Illinois at Chicago   December 1  
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC)   TBA  
University of Massachusettes   January 25  
University of Miami Late December Late January/Early February Late February
University of Michigan   January 28  
University of North Carolina (UNC)   January 28  
University of Notre Dame   Mid-December  
University of Pennsylvania December 16    
University of Richmond December 15 January 25 February 15
University of Rochester Mid-December   Early-February
University of San Francisco Mid-December Mid-December  
University of South Carolina   December 13  
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)   February 1  
University of Wisconsin-Madison   January 29  
University of Vermont   Late December  
University of Virginia December 10 at 5pm EST TBA  
Vanderbilt University January 15   TBA
Villanova University December 15 January 15 March 1
Virginia Tech Mid-December Late February  
Washington & Lee University December 15 @8pm EST   Late-January
Washington University in St. Louis (Wustl) TBA   TBA
Wellesley College Mid-December   Mid-February
Wesleyan University Mid-December   Mid-February
William & Mary Early December   Early February
Williams College TBA    
Worcester Polytechnic Institute December 15 January 15 February 15
Yale University   Mid-December  

 

 

GPA Test Prep College Admissions

Top 3 Tips to Help You Start to Prepare for College Admissions

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought changes to every aspect of our lives, from how we socialize to how we learn, and of course, to how we need to prepare for college admissions. If you are still unsure about which path to take on your college admissions journey, don’t worry – you’re not the only one.

 

While we don’t have the superpower to predict the future, Team Insight has been keeping a close monitor on the latest college admissions news and making projections that can help keep your options open as we gear up for the 2021-2022 admissions cycle.

 

Now, let’s dive in!

 

Insight Advice #1: Provide Positive Data (as much as you can).

 

A solid GPA, a progressively challenging curriculum, and well-written college essays – all of these are considered positive data about yourself. College admissions offices want to see that you can handle the academic work, but they also want to get to know you. What are your values? How do you spend your spare time? What are you devoting your time to during the summer?

 

In addition to GPA, academic profile, college essays, extracurricular activities, and awards, another positive data you can provide on your college application is test scores. A strong ACT or SAT score adds value to your college application, even for test-optional schools. In 2021, more than half of the applicants chose to submit their test scores. From the data, those who included their test scores have a higher chance of acceptance. Approximately 60% of the students who applied for Rice University submit a test score. Of the students accepted by Rice University, 80% submitted an SAT or an ACT score.

 

Insight Advice #2: Stay Informed. Prepare Ahead.

 

While we are uncertain whether test-optional admissions policies will continue, what you can do is research thoroughly into the school of your choice. Stay informed about their testing policies. Check the admissions website and their emails to see if there are any changes in test-optional policies. Most importantly, don’t wait till the last minute! It takes time to prepare for the ACT or the SAT, so plan enough time for test prep.

 

Read more: How to approach standardized testing this summer

 

At Insight, we use the term “relative to your peers” as a guide. What does it mean? In the case of testing, if your friends are planning on taking the SAT or ACT in the fall, it may be a good idea for you to take the test, too. When the admissions office evaluates your college application, they are comparing you to those similar to you, such as your high school’s graduating class. In addition, if you are applying to a competitive school or program that may have many applicants with test scores, you should also prepare for the ACT/SAT.

 

Need help improving your SAT test scores? CLICK HERE to see our summer programs

Taking the ACT instead? CHECK OUT our ACT summer boot camps

 

Insight Advice #3: Research. Research. Research.

 

The biggest 2021 college admissions trend we’ve noticed at Insight is the rise of virtual sessions. Learning about your potential school is now as easy as tapping a few keys. Attend virtual college tours. Ask your questions at virtual info sessions. Use different websites to gather information about a school of your choice. At Insight, our counselors guide students to conduct college research starting in May or earlier, and we continuously revise their list with them.

 

Read more: How to conduct virtual college visits?

 

Another trend that has been accelerated during this time is more students are applying to selective schools, which leads to decreasing acceptance rates. For example, the acceptance rate at the University of Pennsylvania in the 90s was 39%; the acceptance rate in 2021 for UPenn was 9.9%. So be practical when building your college list. Remember, every college on your list, even your safety school needs to be a school you can see yourself in.

 

Read more: Why is it important to find your Best-Fit college?

 

Concluding Thoughts

 

Even if your top schools remain test-optional, remember that test scores may still be required for scholarships or other funding opportunities. During transitions like this, you want to remain flexible and keep your options open. This may mean spending part of your summer doing test prep, but the upside is that you will not be scrambling to take the SAT or ACT at the last minute. Keeping your options open may also mean joining a virtual tour of a college you have not heard of, but you may be pleasantly surprised at what you find. As always, we are here for you! Reach out if you have any questions!

Top 3 Tips to Help You Prepare for College Admissions

 

 

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Class of 2025 Early Decision / Early Action Notification Dates

For many of you, your college admissions season is almost wrapped up (and there is light at the end of the tunnel, we promise). The next big item coming up is early admissions decisions!

 

Like many things this year, the college admissions landscape of 2020 has changed due to COVID-19. Many universities have temporarily adopted the test-optional admissions policy due to SAT/ACT cancellations, and some colleges have extended their application deadlines to allow applicants to complete their applications. While this year causes many obstacles for the high school seniors and families, the anticipation surrounding EA/ED decisions remains high.

 

Insights on Early Decision & Early Action

Our mission at Insight is to help you navigate the college admissions process, and that includes understanding your concerns and providing a tailored strategy for you. Here are the top 3 common questions surrounding ED/EA, and you can always reach out to your Insight Counselor or contact us to find out more!

 

Q: What do I need to do between now and the decision time?

A: Check your portal regularly! Set up a weekly reminder and commit to checking your email and college portal. Some schools may require you to send in your progress report for the current school year.

 

Q: What do I do about ED II if my ED I decision won’t come back until January?

A: You can still apply to ED II. When ED I notifies your acceptance, you can withdraw your application from ED II school.

 

Q: What do I do if my current progress report is not as good?

A: If you are improving but your progress report doesn’t show it, ask your school counselor to make a note on your progress report before you send it to your ED school.

 

Q: Why can’t I find Princeton University on your list?

A: For the 2020-2021 application cycle, Princeton University decided to move to one application deadline of January 1, 2021. 

 

 

2020-2021 College Admissions Season –
Early Decision / Early Action Notification Date for Class of 2025

Here are early admissions decision notification dates for the upcoming Class of 2025. Please check back regularly for updated dates and times as we gather the most updated information – especially for those without specific dates and times or those labeled “TBD.”

Last Updated: December 14, 2020

School

Early Decision I Notification Date

Early Action Notification Date

Early Decision II Notification Date

American University December 31, 2020   February 15, 2021
Amherst College December 15, 2020    
Babson College Mid-December, 2020 January 1, 2021 Mid-February, 2021
Barnard College December 14, 2020    
Bates College December 20, 2020   February 15, 2021
Baylor University December 15, 2020 January 15, 2021 February 15, 2021
Boston College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Boston University December 15, 2020   December 15, 2020
Bowdoin College Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
Brandeis University December 15, 2020   February 1, 2021
Brown University December 16, 2020    
Cal Tech   Mid-December, 2020  
Carleton College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Carnegie Mellon University

December 12, 2020 at 6am PST

   
Case Western University December 5, 2020 December 19, 2020 Beginning January 8, 2021
Clark University December 20, 2020 January 20, 2021 February 20, 2021
Columbia University Mid-December, 2020    
Cornell University

December 12, 2020 at 7pm ET

   
Dartmouth College Mid-December, 2020    
Duke University Mid-December, 2020    
Emerson College Mid-December, 2020 Mid-December, 2020 February 1, 2021
Emory University December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
George Mason University   December 15, 2020  
George Washington University Late-December, 2020   Late-February, 2021
Georgetown University   December 15, 2020  
Georgia Tech   December 4, 2020 (Georgia Student)Mid-January, 2021 (non-Georgia Student)  
Hamilton College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Harvard University   Mid-December  
Harvey Mudd December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Haverford College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Hofstra University   December 15, 2020  
Indiana University Bloomington   January 15, 2021  
Johns Hopkins University December 11, 2020 February 20, 2021  
Lafayette College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
MIT   December 19, 2020 at 3:14 pm EST  
Middlebury College Mid-December, 2020   Early-February, 2021
New York University (NYU) December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Northeastern University December 15, 2020 February 1, 2021 February 15, 2021
Northwestern University Mid-December, 2020    
Oberlin College December 15, 2020   February 1, 2021
Occidental College December 15, 2020   February 20, 2021
Pomona College December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Purdue University   January 15, 2021  
Rice University Mid-December    
Rutgers University   February 15, 2021  
Santa Clara University Late-December, 2020 Late-December, 2020 Mid-February, 2021
Stanford University   December 11, 2020  
Suffolk University   Late-December, 2020  
Swarthmore College Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
Tufts University Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
Tulane University Decemeber 15, 2020 January 15, 2021  
University of Chicago December 21, 2020 December 21, 2020 Mid-February, 2021
University of Georgia   November 20, 2020  
University of Illinois at Chicago   December 1, 2020  
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC)   Mid-February, 2021  
University of Miami Late December, 2020 Late January/Early February, 2021 Mid-Late February, 2021
University of Michigan   Late January, 2021  
University of North Carolina (UNC)   Late January, 2021  
University of Notre Dame   Mid-December, 2020  
University of Pennsylvania December 16 at 7 pm EST    
University of Richmond December 15, 2020 January 25, 2021 February 15, 2021
University of Rorchester Mid-December, 2020   Early-February, 2021
University of San Francisco Mid-December, 2020 Mid-December, 2020  
University of South Carolina   Mid-December, 2020  
University of Texas at Austin   February 1, 2021  
University of Vermont   December 17, 2020  
University of Virginia Mid-December, 2020 Mid-February, 2021  
Vanderbilt University December 15, 2020   February 15, 2021
Villanova University December 15, 2020 January 15, 2021 March 1, 2021
Virginia Tech Mid-December, 2020 Late February, 2021  
Washington & Lee University Late-December, 2020   Late-January, 2021
Washington University in St. Louis December 15, 2020   February 14, 2021
Wellesley College Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
Wesleyan University Mid-December, 2020   Mid-February, 2021
William & Mary December 12, 2020   March 3, 2021
Williams College Mid-December, 2020    
Worcester Polytechnic Institute December 15, 2020 January 15, 2021 February 15, 2021
Yale University   December 16, 2020  

 

 

Early Decision vs. Early Action – Which to Choose?

If you are entering the college admissions process, you might have heard of these terms. You might even wonder what they are. What is the difference? Which is better for your college admissions strategy, if at all? Insight College Admissions counselor Amy Brennen is here to share with you all the insights on Early Decision and Early Action, so you can pick the option that best suits your needs.

Quick Summary

  –   Both Early action and early decision have earlier application deadlines than regular admissions.

  –   You will also receive college admissions decisions earlier, usually starting in mid-December.

  –   You can apply to as many schools as you want using EA.

  –   ED is for only one school, and it is a binding agreement, which means you have to attend when you are accepted.

“Early Decision” and “Early Action” are likely terms that you have heard before when talking about the college application process. The biggest thing to get your head around – what is the difference between the two? They have similar names but are quite different in their outcomes. 

 

 

What is Early Action?

As the name implies, your college applications are due earlier than regular application deadlines. Typical deadlines for regular applications can be December 1st and January 15, whereas early deadlines mean you’re probably submitting around November 1st. For some schools and majors, you need to complete your admissions file by mid-October.

 

There is no limit to the number of schools you can apply to using early action. This can be a great option because it means you have submitted applications to schools early in the season – they’re off your plate! But why would you want to submit your applications a month before everyone else?

 

According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC), early action means that “students apply early and receive a decision well in advance of the institution’s regular response date.” And that is a big advantage. You will receive your admissions decisions back earlier! You may find out in December or January about where you stand with your dream school. That may also mean you can relax and enjoy the rest of your senior year.

 

Another advantage with early action is that you do not need to commit until May 1 (the national response date), so you have almost half a year to decide and to compare financial aid packages. 

 

Though to make things confusing, some schools use restrictive early action (or single-choice early action), which is exactly like early decisions. The restrictive early action limits you to using the process only once. Thus, be diligent in your college research and weigh your options carefully before committing to applying early. 

 

What is Early Decision?

Unlike early action, early decision is binding! You can apply to only one because you are saying that if the school accepts you, you will 100% attend. Because of this commitment, colleges require signatures from you, your family, and a school counselor in order for you to apply early decision.

 

Early decision benefits students who know their first-choice college and who are confident in their odds of getting accepted. Similar to early action, you will also receive an admissions decision early, usually in December.

 

One of the challenges with early decision can be that you will not find out about other schools until later in the year. If you get into a different school that you’d actually like to attend more than your early decision school, you don’t have the option to switch. So be 100% certain about your early decision school. If you are torn on which school you would ultimately like to attend, or which major you’d like to do, early decision might not be for you.

 

Another aspect of early decision to consider is the financial side of it all. If you apply early decision, you’re telling the school that you will attend no matter what. This means they are less likely to offer you a scholarship or financial aid because they know they don’t need to add those incentives to sway you to attend their school. If you are counting on some financial help, early decision again may not be right for you.

 

What Are the Benefits of Applying Early?

By applying early, you stagger the deadlines, which alleviate the stress that comes with stacked regular admissions. Early action allows you until May 1 to decide whether or not you want to attend that school. Both early action and early decision show the schools that you have done your research and you are interested in these schools.

 

Something else to keep in mind is that some colleges do take a substantial amount of their incoming class from that early decision pool. Many elite schools look at early decision as a way to separate the students that are “kind of interested” from the students that are willing to commit 100% to that school. 

 

Should I Apply Early?

With all the advantages, it may seem compelling to apply early. Keep in mind that the early admissions process works best for students who know their dream school(s) and who feel they are competitive applicants.

 

How do you know if you are competitive? Check the school’s website. Most schools give you an idea of their applicant profile. In addition to your application, you need to thoroughly research the schools. It is not a blanket statement that “all elite schools will take a higher percentage of their class from the early decision applicants”. Some schools only take a slightly higher percentage, and in some cases, the difference between early and regular admissions round is not noticeable at all. Other than the academic offerings, campus, school culture, and location, you should also research the different available financial aid packages. 

 

Our biggest tip is to do your research! Talk to your school (and Insight) counselor, your parents, and family members. Figure out if you have a school on your list that might be a good candidate for early decision, and if you do, make sure you are prepared for the financially and mentally to commit to that school.

What are College Admissions Officers Looking for?

insight into college admissions interview

An Interview with Santa Clara University’s Claire Kreeft, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admissions

I conducted an interview via email with Ms. Claire Kreeft, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admission at Santa Clara University (SCU).  Ms. Kreeft provides invaluable insights into the admissions process at SCU.

 

Please note that this interview was conducted shortly before SCU announced that it will be going test-optional for the next two years (meaning SAT or ACT scores will not be required to apply to SCU for the next two years), so please keep that in mind when you are digesting Ms. Kreeft’s responses.

 

Insight counselor Jason:  What are the most important factors in a student’s application?  Why?

 

Ms. Kreeft:  At Santa Clara University we have a holistic application review process. What we mean by that is that we consider all parts of the application to paint a larger picture for each student. We do not have a minimum GPA or test scores (although those are still important factors in the application), so we balance those hard data points with the student’s story they share with us through the personal statement, involvement, and supplemental questions.

The different parts of the application are indicators of different things and are thus all-important. GPA, test scores, and transcript help us determine if the student is academically ready for SCU. The personal statement, extracurriculars, and service work help us determine if a student would be a good fit for our campus and if we can support what that student wants to do.

That being said, if a student is well below the average in both GPA and test scores, it is tough to make a case for a positive admission decision. 

 

Jason: What sets accepted applicants apart from the rest of the pack?

 

Ms. Kreeft:  A student that can articulate what they want to do, how they have practiced this so far, and why they want to continue it on my campus stands out. What makes an applicant memorable is when they can show us how they have maximized their opportunities so far and how they plan to take advantage of what we offer at SCU, it is not one magic factor like the right number of APs. At one high school taking 10 APs before you graduate may be rare, whereas at another high school it may be the norm.

What we want to see is how a student pursues their interests and passions.

If you want to be an engineer, what projects or clubs have you invested yourself in to further explore this? If you want to partake in undergraduate research, have you looked into what ongoing projects we have and if professors on our campus are engaged in your topics of interest? 

 

Jason:  What is the best advice you could give to prospective applicants?

 

Ms. Kreeft:  The best advice I can give to prospective applicants is to think about your non-negotiables.

What will you need on a college campus to feel comfortable and successful? Size and location are two of the most impactful features of a college campus that the individual student cannot change, so think carefully about the type of environment you want when crafting your list of schools to apply to.

When you have that list, be sure to communicate to those colleges why they are on your list. Don’t just regurgitate the school’s mission statement, be intentional and specific. I can tell pretty quickly when reading a student’s application if they are truly considering SCU or if we were just another college to apply to. 

 

college application advice from undergrad admissions office

 

Jason:  Other than grades and standardized test scores, what is the most important part of the application?  Why?

 

Ms. Kreeft:  In holistic admissions, this is a difficult question to answer (and one that doesn’t really have one answer), because the whole point is that the elements of the application complement each other to give depth to a student.

One factor that is often overlooked, but is very important, is rigor (or strength of schedule). When we see your high school transcript we see what your choices were for classes. Especially in a college landscape with increasing test-optional application routes, a student still needs to demonstrate the strength of their academic career. Rigor becomes especially important for students seeking admission to our more specialized programs in Business and Engineering.

Just taking a standard college prep course load will not be enough. Also, a student is more than just the things they study and the tests they took. Use the story part of your application (essay, involvement, supplements) to give life to your file. 

 

 Jason:  How much does an applicant’s choice of major factor into whether they are accepted or not?  Are there certain majors that affect admissions decisions more than others, and if so, which majors?

 

Ms. Kreeft:  At Santa Clara University, it is actually the choice of school that matters more than the choice of major when it comes to selectivity. When you apply to SCU, you will choose to apply to the College of Arts and Sciences (about 55% of the undergraduate population), the Leavey School of Business (about 30% of the undergraduate population), or the School of Engineering (about 15% of the undergraduate population).

While it is the same application process for each of the three schools, the way we read the applications is a bit different. With our more specialized (and smaller) programs of Business and Engineering, we take a closer look at a student’s academic history in certain areas.

For Business that would be in math, specifically looking for calculus. For Engineering that would be math and science, specifically looking for calculus and physics. The one major that has the greatest impact on an application, and is our most selective, is Computer Science in the School of Engineering. Students admitted to this major tend to have our highest average GPAs/test scores as well as having demonstrated a prior interest in and commitment to this field.

 

 Jason:  What advice can you offer regarding application essays?

 

Ms. Kreeft:  The biggest piece of advice I offer students regarding application essays is to centralize your experiences in your own voice.

No matter what the prompt says, an admission office is trying to learn more about who you are and how you will be in their community.

I have read some beautiful essays about how influential a student’s grandmother has been in their life, and then by the end of the essay I want to admit the grandmother and I have learned very little about the student. My first big tip is this: after you write your essay, highlight every sentence that has to do with you (the student) making a decision, reacting to experience, learning a lesson, etc. If this isn’t at least 50% of your essay you need to rewrite it.

My second tip is this: have a few people close to you read over and give you feedback on your essay.

Sometimes we think we know how we sound, but having a fresh set of eyes review your work can make sure you communicate the message and story that you intend to. 

Another important thing to consider, use the additional information section to give more context! This is an optional section in the common application that is essentially bonus free words. There is no prompt; it is not an additional essay. It is simply space for a student to give us more context. If you have something you need to explain, like a poor grade in a class or a personal situation that has impacted your high school career, this is the place to tell us about it. Save your personal statement for the story of who you are and what you care about.

 


Written by Jason Katz

This interview article was conducted and written by Insight Counselor Jason Katz.

Jason has helped hundreds of students gain admission to their best-fit universities. In addition, he wrote more than 170 college admissions/college life columns for the Palo Alto Daily News and the San Jose Mercury News.