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Category: College Prep

Insights into Honors College and Honors Program

So, you have heard great things about honors colleges and college honors programs. Now what? In this blog post, Insight Senior College Admissions Counselor Meilin Obinata will guide you through various factors to help you figure out if one of these would be a good fit for you (or not).

 

What is an Honors College ?

insights into honors college program and benefitsUsually, an honors college is part of a larger school, such as a university system, but often has its own funding sources, residential buildings, and activities specifically designated for honors students to use, live in, and participate in. I tell my students that these big schools often want to offer honors students some of the warm and fuzzy feelings of a liberal arts college, which is dedicated to giving undergraduates more attention and care than a typical big research university would.

 

 

Some perks and requirements you may find within an honors college:

    • Separate application guidelines, with distinct prompts and specific restrictions about who can write your letters of recommendation
    • Small living communities with other honors students
    • Social / networking opportunities with other honors students, faculty, or professionals
    • Priority class registration
    • Smaller class sizes
    • Exclusive classes, events, and scholarship opportunities
    • Mandatory thesis /capstone projects
    • Access to internships or research opportunities designated for honors students
    • Additional required coursework or assignments

 

Honors colleges vary widely. So, it is important to dig deep to understand if their philosophy of learning and living is a match for you if you were to be accepted.

Read more: Why It Is Important to Find Your “Best Fit” College

From an admissions standpoint, an honors college will have an admit rate much, much lower than the school in general. For example, sometimes students do not realize that applying to Barrett Honors College at Arizona State University is very selective because they are thinking of the overall admit rate to ASU, which is very generous (as of today at least). This means you will need to take this into account when building your college list – an honors college may very well be a “dream” or “reach” choice when the college at large may occupy a different category of risk.

honors program insights to help you decide if you should apply to college

You may also want to research honors colleges with a very clear view of how these programs intersect with your life goals inside the college and beyond college. Schreyer’s Honors College students at Pennsylvania State University can apply to an Early Assurance Program for Penn State’s medical school, which could be very attractive if you wish to become a doctor one day, for example.

 

What is a college’s Honors Program ?

These are programs often requiring students to meet a variety of standards, such as keeping a certain grade point average or completing specific courses within a major or department. This is more like an academic lane. Students may need to complete additional assignments and/or projects in order to graduate “with honors.”

 

One of my students was interested in the University of Washington, and I encouraged her to consider the honors program because of the interdisciplinary nature of the subjects and activities that she pursued in high school. She applied – and that program turned out to be one of her acceptances. She ultimately decided to attend the University of Washington because of the opportunities related to that specific program.

 

What should you think about before applying?

    • Treat the application as an entirely separate entry on your college list, as in, it should “count” in your mind as a separate college, with its own category of risk.
    • Research honors programs and colleges deeply before deciding to apply – don’t underestimate the work involved with applying to one of these. You might ultimately decide to apply to another college instead of applying to an honors option due to your overall workload in the application process.
    • As wonderful as these might be, you might look at the requirements for being a student in an honors college or honors program and decide – hey, this is too restrictive for my needs!

 

We hope you learned more about honors options so that you are better prepared for your college research process. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to your Insight counselor. Cheers!

Not an Insight Counseling family yet? No problem! CONTACT US to schedule a 1-hour personalized college planning session with an experienced admissions counselor. 


Written by Meilin Obinata

This article is written by Insight Senior College Admissions Counselor Meilin Obinata.

Meilin Obinata is a Senior College Counselor who enjoys learning from her students. She believes education is a creative endeavor and creates a space that allows students to explore new ideas. As a Bay Area native who grew up in Santa Cruz, she is familiar with the local schools. Read her full bio here.

Admitted! Which College Offer Should I Accept?

Congratulations! Around this time of the year, all of us at Team Insight have the privilege to share the joy of our students and families as they receive acceptance letters. Now comes the next big question: “which school should I go to?”

Didn’t get into your top-choice college? Check out our articles on Waitlist and Appeal.

Visiting the colleges you’ve been admitted to is a great opportunity to help inform you about what college is the best fit for you. Many colleges will have an admit visit day—where students across the country can come and visit the schools and programs they were admitted to before they decide which one to attend in the fall. These visits are extremely helpful and informative. For the student, this is your time to really experience the school and see if this is the place you will call home for the next four years.

 

As you go on your visits, it’s important to take into consideration a few things. Ask yourself a few questions—

 

location matters when you are deciding which college to go toLocation/Living experience:

Do you like the campus? What is the dorm situation like? Where do most freshmen live? What food choices do you have- dining halls, cafés, grocery options? Do most students live on campus all 4 years? What are the housing options around campus? What are the different transportation options on campus/ to and from campus?

 

 

 

Community/Extracurricular experience:

What activities are there offered for you as a new student to get plugged into the community? Do they have clubs and organizations you would want to join? When and what resources do they have for mental health/ health?

 

Major/Career experience:learn what support you will have for your potential major and future career

Who is your counselor for your major? How often do you meet with them? What help do you get on your graduation plan and registering for courses? How do you get connected to the tutoring center if you need help with coursework? What opportunities do they offer current students for career exploration/internships/resume help/job fairs? What opportunities do they offer to help with graduate school applications?

 

The next month is an exciting time as you are deciding on which community you will be investing in for the next 4+ years. Remember, this is the place where you will gain the skills you need for the next place of your journey and a place where you will choose to invest your time and resources as well. Pay attention to your own feelings around this choice and be sure to think about where you will be happy and thrive as you pursue your degree and step into your career!

Read more: Explaining “SIR” – Statement of Intent to Register

 


Written by Jenny Bloom

This article is written by Insight Senior Counselor Jenny Bloom.

Jenny has worked with a variety of students since 2012 to help them take the right steps to achieve their academic goals. Part of her philosophy is to guide students to consider how they will build and hone their skills and talents to make a difference in the world around them. Contact Insight Education today to schedule an initial consultation with Jenny. Read her full bio here.

Waitlist and Appeal – What Should You Do?

We always look forward to this time of year filled with excitement — the time when college decisions are released. It marks years of hard work and dedication. It also brings with it hope for the future and a new beginning. And while we celebrate acceptances and struggle with denials, many don’t know how to react to getting waitlisted. In this article, we will explain waitlisting and what you can do, as well as whether you should appeal a denial.

 

(More of a visual learner? Check out our video on Waitlist and Appeal HERE.)

 

What is a waitlist offer?

A waitlist offer means that the college finds that you are a great fit, but it cannot offer you a position at this stage. The reason that you are on the waitlist may vary from school to school and from year to year. Being on the waitlist tends to conjure more disappointment than hope. This is mainly because most don’t understand what the waitlist means and because students are truly just tired of waiting any longer. Many students take this to mean that they fell short or that they are a college’s second, third, or the 40th choice.

 

But what does being offered a position on the waitlist mean?

Colleges have limited seats available to offer which leaves admissions officers having to make some tough choices. When they are offering you a waitlist position, they are sending you the message that they think you are a great fit for the class and your accomplishments have not gone unnoticed. You would be a fantastic addition to the campus, but they need to see how many admitted students will accept their offers of admissions before they pull students off the waitlist to fill any open spots in the freshman class.

Most waitlists are unranked. Colleges are not lying when they say that. It is not some ploy to appease you. Remember that admissions officers are trying to build a well-rounded class. Once the college receives the decisions from its admitted students, they then go through the waitlist to see which students would best complement the incoming class.

At this point, they may also need to evaluate the financial aid it has available to offer students. Accordingly, they will admit students off the waitlist in small batches, offering more spots as they become available. This process is usually complete no later than June, but in very rare situations we have seen students get an offer of admission from the waitlist in early August. This was particularly true during the summer of 2020 due to the impact that Covid had on admissions outcomes for the high school class of 2020.

Wondering what you can do to get off the waitlsit? Contact us today!

Although in our experience students do indeed get off waitlists successfully, it is vitally important that you not rely on a waitlist position. Unfortunately, some colleges are putting thousands of kids on a waitlist and admitting few students. In 2019, 48% of schools admitted less than 10% of students that accepted a waitlist position. Seven percent admitted no one. In that same year, the University of Michigan offered more than 12,000 students a waitlist position and only admitted 89 students. Similarly, UC Irvine offered a waitlist position to more than 17,000 students (about the seating capacity of Madison Square Garden and almost twice the size of the incoming freshman class) and offered spots to 1,600 students. Private schools are no less predictable. Dartmouth took no one off the waitlist while Boston University later offered spots to 11% of students that accepted the waitlist. Conversely, Vanderbilt is well known for the fact that ten percent of its freshman class has historically come from an original waitlist position.

While you are waiting for the waitlists to clear, you should accept a position at another school before May 1st. You should also be excited about that offer and have the full intention of attending and graduating from that university. If a waitlist offer from a school you love DOES come through, you will absolutely have the option to accept that position and withdraw from your original school. In some years, waitlists can clear as late as just a couple of weeks before classes start. You don’t want to be waiting by the mailbox – virtual or real.

 

What can I do about being waitlisted?

It may sound like the college has all the power in this situation. But you do not need to just comply and play the waiting game. Think clearly about whether or not the school or schools that offered you waitlist positions are among your top choices. You are not obligated to accept the position. If it is not a school you would seriously consider, politely turn it down and give another student a chance. Chances are that by declining a waitlist spot you are helping a student or even a close friend at your own high school. Collecting admissions offers is not the goal of the admissions process. Finding a school where you thrive both academically and socially is the actual goal.

If you do want to stay on the waitlist, you are unlikely to get a decision back before the May 1 Statement of Intent to Register (SIR) deadline. This means you must decide among the colleges that accepted you where you will attend. Do not rely on the waitlist. It is completely unpredictable how many students will be offered spots off the list. It can vary from 0 to 300 depending on the college and the year.

While you wait, be excited about your other prospects. Do your due diligence. Visit colleges. Talk to current students. Get engaged with the school you accept. Chances are strong that the college where you submit your Intent to Register is where you will be in Fall.

If you are accepted from a waitlist, you will have very little time to decide. If you decide to accept, you will need to first withdraw your Statement of Intent to Register from the school you accepted. Chances are your family will lose the deposit. It is an extremely straightforward process, and it happens every year. You are not violating any agreements or laws. They may ask you for proof that you were admitted from a waitlist.

 

Can I do something about denials? Should I appeal?

Yes, and no. We get a lot of requests to help with appeals for students who just can’t understand why they received the decision that they did. As tough as it can be to hear, more often than not, the denial decision from a college is the final decision, and launching an appeal process will be unsuccessful because they do not allow them.

However, a great reason to put an appeal together, assuming the university in question offers an appeal process, is if there was something missing from your application. Something you didn’t tell colleges about that you probably should have!

We have worked with students who have successfully appealed a denial because they were afraid to discuss something like a personal struggle that would have given colleges context about why their academic performance wasn’t as strong as it otherwise may have been. Or, not explaining a dip in grades in their application and just glossing over it, hoping that the college didn’t notice.

Another reason could be a major accomplishment may have occurred in the time between submitting the application and receiving the decision! This can be a wonderful thing to make sure the college is aware of. Not all schools will look at new information, so do your research on what constitutes the basis of an appropriate appeal for each university.

Whatever the reason may be for why essential information wasn’t included in the application, those are the types of things we will be looking for if a student comes to us wanting to launch an appeal. It needs to be based on some information that you are ADDING to your file that was missing from the original application.

So, when you receive your decisions and start to think about your next steps, keep in mind the types of information necessary to launch a successful appeal and see if you have any of those. Completing an appeal takes work, time, and emotional energy, so it is important to make sure you understand all your options and if this is the right one for you.

We work with students and families on appeals, waitlists, and college decision meetings. Reach out to us today at info@insight-education.net for more information!

 

All the very best!

Team Insight

ChatGPT vs. Admissions Counselors: Can AI write a compelling college essay?

Will ChatGPT affect your college essay? Are you no longer just competing with your peers in school when applying to college but with artificial intelligence (AI) as well? The new AI-based writing tool, ChatGPT, has been in the headlines. From writing funny song lyrics to writing essays and papers, people are in awe of this tool. More than one million people signed up to test it in the first five days after its release.

However, with ChatGPT’s endless possibilities comes many concerns. Some of our students are concerned that their college application essays will no longer be as powerful. Can the college admissions office even tell? We decided to put that to the test in our video: “ChatGPT vs. Purvi Mody: Can a ChatGPT college essay fool an admissions counselor?

(Some of our other counselors will be doing this challenge too! Check back for their videos!)

 

Is ChatGPT the Tool for Writing Your College Application Essays?

As we played around with ChatGPT and asking it to write different essays, we noticed that sometimes it brings in flawed examples or will completely just make up stories. For example, Purvi tried to ask ChatGPT to write an essay about how a student might use music to express him or herself. The essay contained inaccuracy notes on battling anxiety through music. In addition to fabricating content, ChatGPT also tends to have a much more superficial, generic tone. In short, no, it’s not intended to write your personal statement or college supplement essays for you.

 

For now, ChatGPT’s possibilities may seem limitless. However, for college applications, we should step back and really think about what a college essay is actually about. While it is something that is very scary for many students (and families) to approach, let’s reframe and look at this as an opportunity. This is your chance to tell the admissions offices almost anything that you want and to show them the side of you that is not evident anywhere else in the college application. It is also a method for you to learn more about yourself, your values, and your growth. Writing college essays is a huge task, but it is also rewarding. If you put in the hard work, you will come out of this process feeling more in tune with who you are.

 

Should I still use ChatGPT?

ChatGPT is a great tool, and we’re certainly not avoiding ChatGPT at Insight! Our team is playing around with it. We’re learning more about it. We’re trying to see its possibilities and how we can use it effectively. The biggest limitation, and why we advise against using it to write your college essays, is that ChatGPT is not you. It can mimic your voice, but it cannot replace who you are. When you’re writing your college essays, you need to come alive on the pages. Who you are needs to shine through. Thus, when you know yourself well, you don’t need a tool to tell your story. In fact, you are wasting more time to teach ChatGPT to tell your story accurately and authentically.

 

As you become a rising senior or a senior, your time is very precious. You want to spend time thinking through what you want to convey. Use that time to get to know yourself better. Think about what that you want to get across to college admissions office. We say this at Insight often, the most important part of your college essay is your voice. We know what a 17-year-old sounds like, so admissions officers are super aware of what a 17-year-old sounds like. This is why Insight counselors don’t even want parents touching their children’s college essays because the perspective is very different. When you use a tool that could lead you to losing your voice, you’re sacrificing the most important thing that you are adding to your own college application.

Parenting During College Admissions – Our Top Insights!

College admissions is a stressful time for the entire family. Seniors are anxious about starting a new chapter of their lives and leaving the comforts of home behind. Parents are equally worried about sending their children off into the world, hoping that they have prepared them well over the past 17 years.

 

(Parents, for tips on supporting your child as college decisions are being released, check out this video from Insight’s Co-Founder and Head of Admissions Counseling Purvi Mody). 

 

But before families can see their children off, they must first get through the admissions process. Increasingly, parents are taking a much deeper role in the process — some for better and some for worse. Below are some insights into what the parents’ role should and should not be during the college admissions process.

 

1 – Guide your child in choosing colleges that would be a great fit, but don’t force your child to only apply to schools that you like. This is the perfect opportunity to have an open conversation with your child. Emphasizing rank and brand might cause your child to react negatively to the pressure.

 

2- Check if your child is ok with this before reading over your child’s essays and giving advice. Do not write or rewrite the essays for them. A teenager’s voice is distinctly different from a parent’s voice. Colleges want to hear from the students about what is important to them, and admissions officers are very savvy about distinguishing essays written by parents and those written by students.

 

3 – Drive your child to an interview or college visit, but let them take control once you arrive. If your child is interviewing with a local alumnus or admissions officer, refrain from introducing yourself or even going into the interview location. When visiting colleges as they come to your school or town, encourage your child to talk to the presenters.

 

4 – If you have questions that can only be answered by an admissions office, have your child call. It helps the student to develop the ability to speak to adults and to take control of the admissions process. Do not call the admissions office frequently with questions that can be answered by perusing the website.

 

5 – Students will need to ask their teachers for letters of recommendation. It’s not appropriate for parents to ask on their behalf.

 

6 – Remind your children about due dates and help them manage the process, but don’t micromanage them. Doing so will cause undue stress for everyone.

 

7 – Do not request letters of recommendation from family friends because of their connections if they genuinely have not had significant interaction with your child.

 

8 – Be ambitious yet realistic in expectations. Support your children in applying to schools they really love, even though they may be a little (or much) harder to get into. Make sure, though, the list is balanced so that there are options in April.

 

9 – Don’t compare your students to others. Rising seniors and seniors are as stressed as they can be right now, and comparisons to other children can only make them feel inferior.

 

10 – Celebrate all successes. Every acceptance is cause for celebration, even if it is a safety school. This will give your child confidence as the other decisions come.

 

While applying to college is a means to an end, it is a learning process nonetheless. Your children are learning to be an adult and you are learning to let them be more independent. Your support and words of encouragement can make all the difference.

 

In a few months, essays, applications, interviews, and supplements will be a distant memory, but the relationship you build and the bounds you establish now can last a lifetime.

 

 


Written by Purvi Mody

This article was written by Insight’s Co-Founder and Head of Counseling Purvi Mody.

Since 1998, Purvi has dedicated her career to education and is exceedingly well-versed in the college admissions process. Her philosophy centers around helping kids identify and apply to the schools that are the best fit for them and then develop applications that emphasize their unique attributes and talents.

Accepted, Deferred, or Denied: Understand Early Admissions Results

If you submitted your college application early back in October or November, late December and early January is usually a very exciting time for you as you are starting to hear back your early admissions results.

 

Not sure when will you know your early decision or early action results? Check out Class of 2027 Early Decision / Early Action Notification Dates.

 

There are three possible results that can happen: accepted, deferred, or denied. In this article, Insight’s Head of College Admissions Counseling Purvi Mody shares what each admissions decision can mean for you and what you can do!

 

(More of an audio learner? Check out Purvi’s YouTube video here.)

 

Accepted!

Congratulations! You may have one or several colleges to attend in Fall 2023. Whether or not you have to accept the school’s offer depends on the early admissions plan you chose when you applied. If you applied for early decision (ED), it is binding and means you are bound to attend that university. In other words, now that you are accepted in the ED round, you can celebrate! You are done. Don’t forget to withdraw all your other college applications, turn down any other offers, and get your new college swags!

 

Binding or nonbinding? Early Decision vs. Early Action – Which to Choose?

 

If you are accepted into your dream schools, congratulations! That is amazing news, and you have accomplished a huge feat. This does NOT mean you can just party all the way till Fall. What this means is that now you can enjoy your senior year of high school. Spend time with your friends and family (especially if you are going far to college). Make the most of it while keeping up your academics.

 

Why can’t you just take things easy? First, you don’t want colleges to rescind your offers. Your grades will have to drop significantly for colleges to take back the offers, but the chance is never zero. The other reason (possibly the more important one) is that you are going to be a college student in a few months. Odds are that you are going to a college filled with brilliant, smart cookies like yourself. You want to keep up the rigor, the stamina, and the work ethic, so that when you start college, you are already used to the pace. If you start to take things too easy now, then you will have to work extra hard to level back up when you start college.

 

Keep working hard and finish your senior year strong! The beautiful thing is that now you are studying just for yourself. I hope you are always working hard for yourself, but admittedly, I know that college admissions are always in the back of our minds. Now, with your early acceptance, you are truly 100% doing this for yourself. So please keep up your rigor and continue to work hard for you!

 

Deferred

Whether you chose early decision, early action, or restrictive/single-choice early action, if you are deferred from the early admissions round, all that means is the colleges want to view your application in the context of their regular applicant pool. It is not a rejection. The college admissions office still finds you interesting and your college application compelling. In some cases, the admissions office wants more information before they can make a decision.

 

If you are deferred, continue to work on other college applications and apply during the regular decision deadlines. If you applied ED but were deferred and then later accepted in the regular round, you are no longer bound by the ED agreement. In short, if you are deferred and then accepted, you don’t have to attend that school. You are free to choose other colleges that offer a better financial package or a more appealing program.

 

What if you REALLY REALLY want to go to this college but got deferred; what should you do? Remember, you submitted your application back in October or early November. Now you have accomplished new things, such as your first semester’s grades, new activity achievements, or new responsibilities. Many colleges will allow you to submit an update or a letter of continued interest (LoCI). Some universities will have very specific forms that you need to fill out while others treat LoCI as optional. Be sure to check each school’s requirements carefully, so you continue to make a good impression.

 

Keep in mind that you are now competing with applicants in the regular round, and they will have at least six more weeks’ worth of information that they are submitting. You want to make sure you’re doing the same in your letter of continued interest. The information you want to include in your letter of continued interest could be

 1. academic performance (without restating info from your mid-year report)
 2. extracurricular activities (without repeating what is already on your application)
 3. new hobbies or responsibilities
 4. and any new achievements or awards

 

Finally, a few more key notes on the letter of continued interest:

 1. Keep it short and succinct. Ideally, your LoCI should not exceed one page.
 2. Check the university’s policy. Will they accept a LoCI? What should the format be? Follow those policies closely!
 3. Spend some time working on it, just like you would on your college essays.
 4. Send in ONLY ONE thorough update. Do not repeat information that is already in your mid-year report or college applications.
 5. Make sure you send it at an appropriate time. Usually, this is mid-January, though different colleges have different specifications.

 

Read more on Writing A Letter of Continued Interest

Denied

If you are denied in the early round, that college application is completed for this year. The college does not want any additional information, and you cannot appeal that decision. You also can no longer apply for the same college this admissions cycle.

 

Sometimes a student may ask, “If I am denied in the early admissions round, can I apply to the same college in the regular deadline?” No. In one admission year, you can only apply to one time to a given school.

 

This is not the end of the world. This does not mean you are not hardworking or driven. It does not mean your college application was terrible. There are many, many great schools out there, and we hope that some of those colleges made it into your college list. In this case, you should focus on other colleges, polish your college essays, and perhaps submit additional college applications.

 

Concluding thoughts: 

Those are the three early admissions results and what you should do in each case. The determining factor is your early admissions option. If you apply early action or restrictive early action, the result is not binding. You can still consider other offers as they come in. Though, I will say this final piece of advice: if you are accepted early into a college you’re definitely going to attend, stop applying. Give other applicants the spot. Alleviate yourself from the stress and time. Focus on making the most of your senior year!

 

If you are a sophomore or a junior planning ahead, don’t wait! Early application requires careful strategizing and early planning. Contact us today and schedule a 1-hour personalized college planning session with our experienced college admissions counselor to see how you can maximize your admissions chance!

 

 


Written by Purvi Mody

This article was written by Insight’s Co-Founder and Head of Counseling Purvi Mody.

Since 1998, Purvi has dedicated her career to education and is exceedingly well-versed in the college admissions process. Her philosophy centers around helping kids identify and apply to the schools that are the best fit for them and then develop applications that emphasize their unique attributes and talents.

Top 3 College Admissions Interview Questions and How to Answer Them

Picture this. You are sitting in front of your computer, smiling as wide as you can. You hope the person at the other end of the video call can’t see you sweat. Your heart is pounding so hard that you can hear it through your headphones. Yes, this is it. This is your college admissions interview!

Continue reading

Class of 2027: Early Decision / Early Action Notification Dates

For many of you, your college applications are almost completed (and there is light at the end of the tunnel, we promise). The next big item coming up is early admissions decisions!

 

The college admissions landscape continues to surprise us this year. The new, digital SAT will be implemented in Spring 2024, and some schools, such as MIT, terminate their test-optional admissions policy. With USC offering its first Early Action admissions option and CalTech moving to a new Restricted Early Action plan, notification dates for early admissions results seem more important than ever!

 

Insights on Early Decision & Early Action

For 23 years, Insight Education is committed to helping high school students and families to navigate the college admissions process, and that includes understanding your concerns and providing a tailored strategy for you. Here are the top 3 common questions surrounding ED/EA, and you can always reach out to your Insight Counselor or contact us to find out more!

 

Q: What do I need to do between now and the decision time?

A: Check your portal regularly! Set up a weekly reminder and commit to checking your email and college portal. Some schools may require you to send in your progress report for the current school year.

 

Q: What does my result mean? Can I do anything if I am deferred?

A: To understand your result, check out our article “Accepted, Deferred, or Denied: Understand Early Admissions Results.” If you are deferred from your dream school, don’t worry! You’re not out of the race yet. The school wants to compare you to their regular applicant pool OR they simply need more details from you. To learn more about that, visit The Importance of Writing A Letter of Continued Interest  

 

Q: What do I do about ED II if my ED I decision won’t come back until January?

A: You can still apply to ED II. When ED I notifies your acceptance, you can withdraw your application from ED II school.

 

Q: What do I do if my current progress report is not as good?

A: If you are improving but your progress report doesn’t show it, ask your school counselor to make a note on your progress report before you send it to your ED school.

 

 

2022-2023 College Admissions Season –
Early Decision / Early Action Notification Date for Class of 2027

Here are early admissions decision notification dates for the upcoming Class of 2027. Please check back regularly for updated dates and times as we gather the most updated information – especially for those without specific dates and times or those labeled “TBD.”

Last Updated: January 9, 2023

School

Early Decision I Notification Date

Early Action Notification Date

Early Decision II Notification Date

Early Action II Notification Date

American University December 16   February 15  
Amherst College December 9 @ 6:21pm ET      
Babson College December 14  December 16 Mid-February  
Barnard College December 14 @6:30pm ET      
Bates College December 20   February 15  
Baylor University December 5  January 15 March 1  
Bentley University Late December   Early February  
Boston College December 6   February 15  
Boston University December 13   February 15  
Bowdoin College December 9   Mid-February  
Brandeis University December 15   February 1  
Brown University December 20 @ 7pm ET      
Bryn Mawr College December 16 @ 5pm ET   ED2: TBA  
Bucknell University December 14   Mid-February  
Cal Tech   December 10 @ 8:06am PT    
Carleton College December 15      
Carnegie Mellon University

December 10 after 9 am ET

  February 1  
Case Western University December 5 December 21 Beginning January 9  
Chapman University December 16 Late December, rolling through early February    
Clark University Late December Mid-January Early February  
Claremont McKenna College December 15   February 15  
Clemson University   December 1    
Colby University On and before December 15   On and before February 15  
Colgate University Mid-December   Mid-February  
Columbia University December 15 @ 7pm ET      
Cooper Union

Late December

     
Cornell University

December 15 @ 7pm ET

     
Dartmouth College December 16 @ 3pm ET      
Davidson College December 15 @ 9pm ET   February 1  
Drexel University Mid-December Mid-December    
Duke University December 17 @ 2pm ET      
Elon University December 1  December 20    
Emerson College Mid-December Mid-December Early February  
Emory University December 15 after 6pm ET   February 15  
Fordham University December 20  December 20    
George Mason University   December 15    
George Washington University December 15   Late-February  
Georgetown University   December 15    
Georgia Tech  

 December 9 (for Georgia students)

  Late January (for Non-Georgia students)
Hamilton College December 15   February 15  
Harvard University    REA: December 15 at 7pm ET    
Harvey Mudd December 15   February 15  
Haverford College December 10   Early February  
Hofstra University  

December 15

   January 15
Indiana University Bloomington    January 15    
Johns Hopkins University December 16   February 17  
Lafayette College December 15 @ 4pm ET   February 15  
Lehigh University December 9   Mid-February  
MIT    December 17 @ 12:17pm ET    
Middlebury College Mid-December   Mid-February  
Mount Holyoke College Late December   Late January  
New York University (NYU) December 15   February 15  
Northeastern University December 8 February 1 March 1  
Northwestern University December 16      
Oberlin College December 15   February 1  
Occidental College December 15   February 20  
The Ohio State University   Late January     
University of Oregon  

November 8 

(some Insight students already heard the great news)

   
Pennsylvania State University (Penn State)  

November 15

(some Insight students already heard the great news)

   
Pomona College December 15 @ 5pm PT   February 15  
Princeton University   Single Choice Early Action (SCEA) Decision Notification:
December 15
at 7pm ET
   
Purdue University   January 15    
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute December 10  January 28  January 14  
Rice University December 14 after 5pm CT      
Rutgers University   January 31    
Santa Clara University Late December Late December Mid-February  
Stanford University    REA: December 16 @ 4pm PT    
Suffolk University   Late December    
Swarthmore College December 13 at 7pm ET      
Syracuse University  Late December rolling through January

 

   
Temple University  

November 18

(Some Insight students already heard the good news)

Mid-February  
Trinity College  December 15   Mid-February  
Tufts University December 13 at 7pm ET   Mid-February  
Tulane University December 1 at 4pm CT January 15 January 31  
University of Chicago December 21 December 21 Mid-February  
University of Georgia   November 18 at 4pm ET    
University of Illinois at Chicago   December 1    
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC)   January 27    
University of Massachusettes   Late January    
University of Miami December 9 Late January Late February  
University of Michigan   Late January    
University of Minnesota  

November 7

(Including engineering. Some Insight students already heard the good news!)

   February 15
University of North Carolina (UNC)   January 31    
University of Notre Dame  

Restrictive Early Action decisions released in December 16 @ 6:42pm ET

   
University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) December 15 @ 7pm ET      
University of Richmond December 9 January 25 February 15  
University of Rochester Mid-December   Early-February  
University of San Francisco Mid-December Late January    
University of South California (USC)    January 20    
University of South Carolina   December 14    
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)   February 1    
University of Wisconsin-Madison   On or before January 31    
University of Vermont December 20 December 20    
University of Virginia December 13 at 5pm ET February 15    
Vanderbilt University December 14 @ 5:30pm CT      
Villanova University December 14 @ 5pm ET January 20 February 15  
Virginia Tech December 9 at 5pm ET Late February    
Washington & Lee University December 16 @ 8pm ET   Late January  
Washington University in St. Louis (Wustl) December 13   February 17  
Wellesley College December 10   Mid-February  
Wesleyan University December 10   Mid-February  
William & Mary December 9   Early February  
Williams College December 9      
Worcester Polytechnic Institute December 13 January 15 February 15 March 1
Yale University   Single choice early action decisions will be available in December 15 after 5pm ET    

 

 

Summer Opportunities Fair 2022

Thank you for your interest in Insight’s Summer Opportunities Fair on November 5, 2022! We hope you had a great time meeting the participating volunteering, research, and internship programs. This year we had over 250 attendees throughout the day from grade 7 to grade 11. We want to share a few snapshots to capture the day’s festivities and the list of participating programs (listed in alphabetical order).

Wondering what you should do for the summer? Need help with your summer program essays and application process? Contact us and schedule a meeting with our counselors today! 

 

Bay Area Community HealthInsight Education Summer Fair 2022 Bay Area Community Health

Bay Area Community Health was formed in 2020 off the strength of southern Alameda County’s Tri-City Health Center and Santa Clara County’s Foothill Community Health Center. Formed during the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic, Bay Area Community Health (BACH) brings more than 70 years of combined service to an area that stretches from Union City to Gilroy. BACH serves more than 100,000 people, who rely on high-quality healthcare services, regardless of their immigration status, ethnicity, disabilities, or ability to pay.

 

 

 

 

Lumiere Research Scholar Program

Insight Education Summer Fair 2022 Lumiere ResearchThe Lumiere Research Scholar Program is a selective research program for top high school students. As a Lumiere scholar, students work 1-1 with top researchers from universities like Harvard, Stanford, and Oxford. Founded by a Rhodes Scholar and Harvard College classmates, the program guides students in the creation of an independent, 20-page research paper over the course of 10 weeks. 

 

 

 

 

 

Our City ForestInsight Education Summer Fair 2022 Our City Forest

Our City Forest (OCF) is an urban forestry non-profit located in the heart of San Jose. OCF’s mission is to create a green and healthy Silicon Valley by engaging community members in the appreciation, protection, growth, and maintenance of our urban forest. Volunteer opportunities range from helping out at the Community Nursery and Training Center with various tree and shrub-care activities, to joining at the new Education Center at Martial Cottle Park to help expand the arboretum. OCF also hosts community tree planting events in which volunteers can help plant trees at various locations throughout Santa Clara County! These events are typically held on Saturdays. 

 

 

 

PilotCity

Insight Education Summer Fair 2022 PilotCity Student InternshipsPilotCity runs programs where students “build projects to win internships” with our employers – serving as an engine for innovation in cities with the people from there. Students enrolled in the program explore employer projects, choose a project, and then are guided through a series of unlockable activities & deliverables to complete to then auto-apply, interview & win offers for internships. Upon hire, interns further advance their project, assigned tasks, and the objective of the employers.

 

 

 

 

Pioneer Academics Insight Education Summer Fair 2022 Pioneer Student Scholar Research Program

The Pioneer Research Program is a virtual research institute for outstanding high school students worldwide. It offers STEM, social sciences, and humanities disciplines. Widely respected for its high standards in admissions selectivity and academic rigor, it is the only US online college credit-bearing research program for high school students. In Pioneer’s rigorous academic system, students work one-on-one with university professors in advanced study and research of a topic of their interest, culminating in a full-length research paper. To learn more about Pioneer Academic’s Information Sessions, please click here.

 

 

Polygence

Insight Education Summer Fair 2022 Polygence Student Research ProgramPolygence is an online research academy connecting high achieving students with expert mentors to pursue personalized research projects and publish research papers. Polygence offers project-based research mentorship in academic disciplines across STEM, the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts. Polygence students submit their projects to high school science fairs, research journals, and conferences with guidance from expert mentors. Mentors hold PhDs, MDs, JDs, MAs, and MFAs in a variety of disciplines from neuroscience and computer science to fashion design and architecture.

 

 

 

Rosetta Institute of Biomedical ResearchInsight Education Summer Fair 2022 Rosetta Institute of Biomedical Research Program

Rosetta Institute provides advanced classes for high achieving high school and middle school students interested in pursuing a career in medicine or related fields, such as biomedical research, drug development, pharmacy, or nursing. They offer a variety of workshops related to molecular medicine – Molecular Biology, Medicinal Chemistry, Medical Bioinformatics, Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Covid-19: Biology/Immunity/Medicine, Cancer Research, Immunology Research, and Biomedical Research – that are taught by PhD-level instructors with years of research and teaching experience. 

 

 

 

Youngzine: Summer Climate Fellowship Program

Insight Education Summer Fair 2022 Youngzine Climage Change Volunteer Student Fellowship ProgramYoungzine teaches children about our environment and the changing climate. Its mission is to empower youth to action. Youngzine’s Climate Fellowship provides an opportunity for high school students to help combat climate change and contribute to a more sustainable future. During a three-week program, students will have the chance to learn about climate change issue, interact with climate experts, and develop a climate or sustainability-related project. Throughout the year, Youngzine offers training and opportunities for high school writers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more: Top 6 Summer Activities for High School Students

 

Extracurricular and summer activities are important in building a powerful narrative in your College Application. It is also important to help build your character, skillset, network and values! Not sure what summer or extracurricular activities you should do?  Contact us and schedule a meeting with our counselors today! 

Your Best Insights to Early Admission Options

Over the past few years, all of us at Team Insight are noticing more and more families want to know if early admission option can increase their chance of acceptance. While early admissions may have a higher acceptance rate, it’s important to understand your options and weigh the restrictions before you send in your application!

 

Most of you probably know about early actions (EA) and early decisions (ED). If you are uncertain, you can learn more about them in our article “Early Decision vs. Early Action.” In addition to early decisions and early actions, we will also explain restrictive early actions (REA) and single-choice early actions (SCEA) and provide insights on Early Decision 2 (ED2).

 

Early Decision 1 (EDI or ED1)

If you look at any of the admissions statistics, you may be shocked at how high the acceptance rates are compared to regular decisions. Before you jump in and apply ED, note there is a catch. Early decision is binding. You can apply ED to only ONE college, and if you are accepted, you must withdraw all your applications to other universities. Essentially, when you apply ED to a school, you are signing a contract telling this school, “You’re my number one choice, and I will absolutely attend if I am accepted.”

 

Should you do that for your dream school? The answer is “it depends.” ED doesn’t mean less competitive; it may even be more competitive because it is a self-selecting process. Everyone who applies ED to UPenn is highly qualified, not to mention they are well-motivated to plan and start their application process early. If you are confident that you can finalize a high-quality college application by the typical November ED deadline, ED may be an option for you.

 

The other consideration is financial aid. Once again, when you apply early decision, you are signaling to the college that you will attend no matter what. This means colleges are less likely to offer you scholarships or financial aid. Therefore, if you are counting on financial help, then early decision may not be the right option.

 

Read more: Think it Through: Early Decision

 

Early Decision 2 (EDII or ED 2)

This is a relatively new admissions option, and not all colleges offer this. You follow the same rule as ED1. For many schools, ED2 deadline is slightly before or the same as regular decision. Why would you choose the ED2 option then? The main reason you’d apply ED2 is that you were deferred or rejected from your ED1 college.

 

Like ED1, your ED2 school is a college that you are excited to attend. Although early decision 2 admissions rate is not as high as early decision 1 acceptance rate, it can still provide you with a boost because of the binding policy.

 

A word of caution for ED2: some universities (for example, Santa Clara University) offer both early action and early decision 2. You cannot switch from early action to early decision 2. That’s why ED2 options need to be factored in early during the admissions process rather than treated like a backup option. If you are not sure which of your top-choice colleges offer ED2 or how to use it to your advantage, reach out to your Insight Counselor!

 

Have quesitons about applying early? Talk to one of our Counselors today!

 

Early Action (EA)

The deadlines for early action are typically November 1st or November 15th. For some schools and majors, you may need to submit your application as early as mid-October. When you apply EA, you can apply to as many schools as you want. A word of caution, some colleges offer EA programs, but the admissions process is closer to restricted early action, which we will get to in the next section.

 

What’s the benefit of submitting your applications early? In addition to getting a big to-do item checked off before your high school finals, you also hear about the admissions results earlier. You may find out in December or January whether you get to attend your top-choice school, and who wouldn’t like that as a Christmas present?

 

The other advantage is you have time on your side to strategize (or relax) since you won’t have to commit to a college until May 1st. This gives you time to apply to more schools, compare financial aid options, and visit more campuses. Since early action is non-binding, you can choose what you like the most.

 

Restrictive or Single-Choice Early Action (REA or SCEA)

This is where things get a bit more complicated. Whether you see restrictive early action or single-choice early action, please note that REA and SCEA are interchangeable. Ultimately, it’s up to the admissions office’s restrictions, so always remember to read the college admissions website carefully. When in doubt, talk to your Insight Counselor!

 

There are two different types of restrictive early action, and we will explain both with examples. The first type of REA limits perspective students from applying ED to any universities, nor can they apply EA to any private colleges. The colleges that adopt this type of REA are Stanford, Harvard, Princeton, CalTech, and Yale (on Yale’s admissions site, this is known as the single-choice early action). This means if you are applying early to Princeton, you cannot apply EA to USC, but you can still apply EA to University of Michigan.

 

USC now words their early action deadline differently, so you may still be able to apply to restrictive early action to some of the examples listed above. Wonder how this might work? Schedule a personalized college admission strategy session with an Insight counselor today! 

 

The second type of REA does not limit the type (private or public) of EA schools you can apply to. Georgetown is a good example. On the admissions page, Georgetown classifies its program as early action, but their description of their EA program outlines the restriction. If you apply early to Georgetown, you can still apply EA to both USC and UMich, but you cannot apply to any early decision programs.

 

While it may be confusing on what you can or cannot apply, the restrictions end at the early admissions round. Both REA and SCEA are non-binding. Thus, you can still apply to other schools during regular decision deadlines, and you can enroll in the college that you like the most.

 

Final Insights

While you may use early admissions to increase your chance in getting into your dream schools, it’s still important to have a strong college application that tells a powerful personal narrative. Ultimately, it’s up to you. How thoughtful you are in putting together your college list. Have you talked to your parents about financial aid? Did you send your application to your Insight Counselor for review yet? Are you following up with teachers who can be strong recommenders? Have you been working on your college essays? Are you scheduling time every week to focus on your application and essays? These are all actions you can take to ensure you have the best chance of maximizing your college admissions acceptance rate. If you need help or additional clarification, don’t hesitate to email us at info@insight-education.net and let our team of experienced college admissions counselors help you!

 

 


Written by Purvi Mody

This article was created from an interview with Insight’s Co-Founder and Head of Counseling Purvi Mody.

Since 1998, Purvi has dedicated her career to education and is exceedingly well versed in the college admissions process. Her philosophy centers around helping kids identify and apply to the schools that are the best fit for them and then develop applications that emphasize their unique attributes and talents.

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